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Cleaning Products

 

What you use to clean your surroundings can affect your health and the environment. EWG gives you the tools to make better choices. Clean wisely.

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

Ordinary school cleaning supplies can expose children to multiple chemicals linked to asthma, cancer, and other documented health problems and to hundreds of other air contaminants that have never been tested for safety, a study by the Environmental Working Group shows. Laboratory tests done for EWG found that a typical assortment of cleaning products released 457 distinct chemicals into the air.

 

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, October 28, 2009

Air pollution testing conducted for the Environmental Working Group (EWG) reveals that cleaning supplies used in 13 key California school districts can cloud classroom air with more than 450 distinct toxic contaminants, including chemical agents linked to asthma and cancer. EWG released its findings today in Santa Monica during a news conference where attendees, again, called on the State legislature to adopt a measure that would encourage school districts across California to use less toxic cleaning supplies.

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News Release
Wednesday, July 22, 2009

I'm a veteran of many a house party for change - and a big fan of the concept. In fact, I got started in online activism at a friend's Moms Rising house party, where we watched a short film and discussed how we could create change - in our own lives and in the public policies that govern them.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Sunday, June 28, 2009

Most people use around 10 personal care products every day with an average of 126 unique ingredients. The government's NOT protecting us. We'd like to believe that the government is policing the safety of all of these mixtures we're putting on our bodies, but they're not. Instead, these under-regulated chemicals are causing concerns for human health and the environment - whether they seep through your skin or wash down your drain.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, June 26, 2009

A while back, EWG staff scientist Olga Naidenko wrote here about the need to focus breast cancer research on prevention - with an emphasis on the role of carcinogens.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, May 6, 2009

 

We're excited to tell you about our new Healthy Home Tips for Parents email series! EWG's scientists and public health researchers created a list of the most important steps you can take at home to promote your family's environmental health.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, May 5, 2009

Beverly Wright has done battle with oil refineries and landfills. She has dug her New Orleans East neighborhood out from under tons of contaminated sludge smeared across the landscape by Hurricane Katrina. A professor, author and leader of the environmental justice movement, she has trained and organized thousands of people to help low income communities stand up against polluters.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, April 8, 2009
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, December 22, 2008

This fall, EPA approved re-registration of antibacterial soap ingredient triclosan for yet another five years of use in consumer products, potentially leaving human and environmental health at great risk.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, October 20, 2008

 

Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP)
Regulatory Public Docket (7502P)
Environmental Protection Agency
1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW.
Washington, DC 20460-0001

October 20, 2008

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Sunday, October 12, 2008

It’s nearly ubiquitous in liquid hand soap and dishwashing detergent, but those aren’t the only products it’s in. Triclosan is also a common ingredient in toothpaste, facewash, deodorant, a host of personal care products, and even mattresses, toothbrushes and shoe insoles. A U.S. FDA advisory committee has found that household use of antibacterial products provides no benefits over plain soap and water, and the American Medical Association recommends that triclosan not be used in the home, as it may encourage bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, July 17, 2008

With no assessment of health risks to infants, federal regulators have approved a hormone-disrupting pesticide, triclosan, for use in 140 different types of consumer products including liquid hand soap, toothpaste, undergarments and children's toys. This exposure has been allowed despite the fact that the chemical ends up in mothers' breast milk and poses potential toxicity to fetal and childhood development.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, July 17, 2008

Triclosan is an antibacterial chemical found in many products. Use EWG's Triclosan to identify and avoid this toxic chemical in dish soap, personal care and other antibacterial products.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, July 17, 2008

Although most shoppers probably don't know it, "antibacterial" isn't just for soap anymore. From sports clothing to cutting boards, deodorants, and children's toys, a wide range of consumer products are now commonly treated with antimicrobial pesticides such as triclosan.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, March 21, 2008

 

EWG urges the California Air Resources Board to reverse a proposal that would weaken safety and anti-smog standards for cleaning products, cosmetics and other household products.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Friday, February 1, 2008

EWG urged the California Air Resources Board to set strict, health-based standards for cleaning products, cosmetics and other consumer goods.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Wednesday, July 25, 2007

You mop your floors, clean the tub, and scrub your toilet until it shines. Or, if you're like me, you make your significant other do it for you. But have you ever stopped to think about why we spend so much time keeping our living spaces clean?

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Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, July 12, 2007

EWG and East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) researchers analyzed samples of wastewater from residential, commercial, and industrial sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. 18 of 19 wastewater samples examined contained at least 1 of 3 unregulated, widely-used hormone disruptors – phthalates, bisphenol A, and triclosan; 2 samples contained all 3 substances. Despite sophisticated wastewater treatment, these chemicals were detected in treated waters discharged into the Bay.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, July 5, 2007

Have you been counting down the days to the Live Earth concerts? We've been pretty quiet on the subject here at Enviroblog, but not because we don't care -- we've just been too busy keeping you in the loop about sunscreencorporate greenwashing, and which water bottles are safest. The Big Day is getting close, though, and we're starting to feel that Live Earth vibe.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post

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