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Environmental connections to public health >>

The Latest from EnviroBlog

Friday, October 6, 2006

Iowa has been chosen as the location for Earthpark, the largest educational center in the United States on environmental and conservation issues. Earthpark Iowa is hoping to have the same success that its predecessor has enjoyed in the UK.

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Friday, October 6, 2006

Faux news from The Onion.

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Thursday, October 5, 2006

In response to the debate National Geographic magazine has recently sparked with its October 2006 article, "The Pollution Within," Environmental Working Group invites journalism students, working journalists and National Geographic in particular to address questions of whether information sources who espouse policy views should be cited in stories.

Wednesday, October 4, 2006

NPR reports uncovering internal documents suggesting that EPA administrator Steven Johnson ignored the advice of EPA scientific advisors when he rejected tougher air quality standards that could save thousands of lives each year.

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Wednesday, October 4, 2006

In the September issue of Fast Company, author Charles Fishman begins his story like this: Sitting humbly on shelves in stores everywhere is a product, priced at less than $3, that will change the world. Soon. It is a fairly ordinary item that nonetheless cuts to the heart of a half-dozen of the most profound, most urgent problems we face. Energy consumption. Rising gasoline costs and electric bills. Greenhouse-gas emissions. Dependence on coal and foreign oil. Global warming.

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Tuesday, October 3, 2006

A quick glance at today's editorials makes clear that spinach and the recent E. coli episode are still on peoples' minds--and with good reason. The New York Times and The Capital Times of Madison are pointing their fingers at the contamination of produce by fecal matter from livestock operations. The Washington Post and Seattle Times go a more macro route, saving their criticisms for the "patchwork" structure of our regulatory agencies and the lack of funding and organization to properly safeguard our food supply.

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Monday, October 2, 2006

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Too much testosterone can kill brain cells, researchers said on Tuesday in a finding that may help explain why steroid abuse can cause behaviorchanges like aggressiveness and suicidal tendencies. [...] Ehrlich's team tried the same thing with the "female" hormone estrogen, just to be fair. "We were surprised, but it actually looks like estrogen is neuroprotective. If anything, there is less cell death in the presence of estrogen," she said. [...] "Next time a muscle-bound guy in a sports car cuts you off on the highway, don't get mad -- just take a deep breath and realize that it might not be his fault," Ehrlich said in a statement.

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Monday, October 2, 2006

 

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is running an investigative series that examines many aspects of farm subsidies. U.S. subsidies for cotton and selected other crops, born in the Great Depression to protect against the occasional bad year, have become a multibillion-dollar entitlement. The program undermines free trade and props up big farmers at the expense of small growers both here and abroad.

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Thursday, September 28, 2006

Water and the rights to it have fueled many debates in the past. Recently several churches in Canada have been advocating against consumption of bottled water, citing ethical, social, and theological reasons.

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Tuesday, September 26, 2006

This week, the October 2006 issue of National Geographic magazine is hitting newsstands and mailboxes with an important, ground-breaking feature story: "Pollution Within." The piece chronicles the pollution of author David Ewing Duncan's body with hundreds of industrial chemicals.

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Tuesday, September 26, 2006

Every year, for last 30 years, Project Censored at Sonoma State University has been collecting and reporting on news that corporate media doesn’t cover. The issues that don’t make it to the corporate media usually involve social justice, human rights, corporate greed and the environment.

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Tuesday, September 26, 2006

While some of the travel trips might not be the safest alternative here in US, like hitchhiking, there is still a lot you can do when traveling to help environment.

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Tuesday, September 26, 2006

From The Washington PostThe United States is the world leader in nanotechnology -- the newly blossoming science of making incredibly small materials and devices -- but is not paying enough attention to the environmental, health and safety risks posed by nanoscale products, says a report released yesterday by the independent National Research Council.

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Monday, September 25, 2006

wka2006010834945_pv.jpgHonda announced Monday its plans for releasing a new and simple diesel powertrain that is as clean as gasoline-fuelled cars. The new cars are slated to hit the U.S. market by 2009.

Monday, September 25, 2006

SHANGHAI (AFP) - Hundreds of angry Chinese women have taken to the streets of Shanghai demanding refunds for US-Japanese cosmetics after authorities detected banned chemicals in some of the products.

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Monday, September 25, 2006

From The Guradian (UK): Consumers are being routinely exposed to unsafe levels of pesticide residues in their food which are nevertheless still within legal limits, campaigners warn today.

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Monday, September 25, 2006

The nation's system for approving and monitoring the safety of medicines is inadequate and needs far-reaching reforms, and the Food and Drug Administration is plagued with poor management and persistent internal squabbling, according to a long-anticipated study of the agency. The study, requested by the FDA, was carried out by the Institute of Medicine, a nonprofit organization created by Congress to advise the federal government on health issues.

Friday, September 22, 2006

Children who eat a bag of potato chips (35g) daily, consume 5 liters (1.3 US gallons) of cooking oil every year. That's the message the British Heart Foundation is looking to spread via their new ad campaign. According to BHF, "nearly a fifth of children eat two packets of crisps per day."

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Friday, September 22, 2006

 

Autism: The continuing debate over whether vaccines play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders is more than academic, with children's health and industry wealth hanging in the balance. British billionaire Sir Richard Branson said yesterday he plans to invest $3 billion in technologies to help combat global warming. The investment, valued in 2006 dollars, will be made over the next 10 years in biofuels and other environmentally friendly ways to replace oil and coal.

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Thursday, September 21, 2006

While sensationalists and those fond of chemical-intensive farming were ready to hang the organic industry at the first mention of an E coli outbreak, NYT farm and food columnist Nina Planck says the culprit is not spinach growers at all, but rather industrial beef and dairy farmers. E. coli O157:H7, the virus strain responsible for making humans ill, is not found in the intestines of cattle fed a natural diet of grass and hay. The virus thrives in the acidic stomachs of cattle fed on grain, the typical feed on industrial farms.

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