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Environmental connections to public health >>

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Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Over 100 accidental ingestions of Colgate-Palmolive’s multi-use cleaner Fabuloso have prompted an article in the journal Pediatrics. Those who drank the cleaning product (40% of whom are over 12), presumably did so because it’s sold in a color and packaging that resembles a sports drink. In honor of their 100th accidental poisoning, Colgate-Palmolive has decided to redo the Fabuloso label to more clearly indicate the product’s intended use.

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Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Today the New York Times reports some disturbing news about certain drugs and cosmetics causing preschoolers to go into puberty. In one case, a girl and her brother--whose father had been using a testosterone skin cream--started growing pubic hair just from skin contact with their father. Her brother also developed some aggressive behavior problems. The article cites some 1998 cases of early breast development in young girls brought on by a shampoo which contained estrogen and placental extract.

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Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Currently, about 40 million acres of rainforest are lost annually, even though they are home to to five to ten million plant and animal species. In addition to their role as diverse habitats, rainforests also help mitigate the effects of global warming by absorbing greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide.

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Monday, October 16, 2006

We learn today, via Effect Measure and DemFromCT at DailyKos, that the CDC has started a blog of their own, with the realization that "new media" is a good vehicle to help advance discussion of federal health policy.

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Monday, October 16, 2006

Check out this 40 second clip of Minnesota Senator Michele Bachmann calling climate change science into question as her audience laughs in her face.

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Friday, October 13, 2006

Multiple articles from recent news.

Thursday, October 12, 2006

A new study of over 1,000 pregnant Michigan women has found that those with hair samples containing high levels of mercury are three times more likely to give birth prematurely. The study acknowledges that pregnant women often receive mixed messages about fish- while they can benefit from unsaturated fatty acids and protein, they are also exposed to hazardous mercury.

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Thursday, October 12, 2006

new study of over 1,000 pregnant Michigan women has found that those with hair samples containing high levels of mercury are three times more likely to give birth prematurely. While this is the first community-based study to investigate the dangers of mercury for pregnant women, it is only one of many to call the into question the risks pregnant women face from mercury exposure.

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Thursday, October 12, 2006

Last week California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) signed a bill to establish a state-wide biomonitoring program aimed at helping to identify populations at-risk from long-term chemical exposures as well as isolate the trends that put certain groups in harm’s way. According to Environmental Science & Technology, public health officials are gaining confidence in the importance of biomonitoring as the method has helped uncover hidden threats as it did with an arsenic-laden skin cream in New York City.

Thursday, October 12, 2006

Isn't this MUCH better? Thanks to EWG designer extraordinaire, Carrie Gouldin, we no longer look like a spam blog. In fact, I'd have to say (in my completely impartial opinion, of course) that we've now got one of the best designs out there. We're still making small tweaks, so please comment or email us if you have trouble with anything, or if something just looks plain wrong on your browser.

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Wednesday, October 11, 2006

Multiple articles from recent news.

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Wednesday, October 11, 2006

Dupont has announced its new sustainability initiative which includes, among other goals, a reduction of air carcinogen emissions and submission to independent third-party verification of environmental management practices at all global manufacturing facilities. Our friend Jeff McIntire-Strasburg of Sustainablog has more to offer on Dupont's announcement.

Wednesday, October 11, 2006

"After being alerted to a scientific report linking high fluoride levels in drinking water to tooth and bone ailments, the Martin County Commission decided Tuesday to reconsider adding fluoride to the county's water in early 2007." [ Link : TCPalm Local News ]

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Wednesday, October 11, 2006

Community groups in San Francisco are testing the city's playgrounds for deadly arsenic, which can leach off of treated wood play structures onto the skin and clothing of children. The City has plans to replace all of the 70's-era structures as funds become available, but in the meantime the city has been sealing them every two years in an effort to prevent arsenic from leaching out of the wood.

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Tuesday, October 10, 2006

Marla Cone of the Los Angeles Times has writtten a brilliant (albeit disturbing) article on the many products for sale in the US which have been banned in most other countries as toxic. The piece leads with an example of formaldehyde-laden plywood, sold throughout the US, but illegal even in China, where it is manufactured.

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Tuesday, October 10, 2006

Thanks to newlyweds Molly Amirault and Dave Higgins of Westbrook, Maine, EWG made its first appearance (as far we know) at a wedding last weekend. Not only did the couple give each of their guests two wallet guides (Pesticides in Produce and Safe Cosmetics)-they also made a contribution to EWG on behalf of each guest. What a great way to celebrate such an important milestone. Congratulations, Molly and Dave!

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Tuesday, October 10, 2006

 

Several TV stations are now using souped-up Hummers not only as their mobile weather stations, but also as educational tools for schoolchildren. ABC 15 in Phoenix is quite proud of its brightly airbrushed “Weather Hummer,” and their Weather on Wheels website features the Hummer in graphics and interactive puzzles for kids. The Hummer also accompanies the staff meteorologists on their educational trips to area schools.

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Monday, October 9, 2006

 

Scientists and Engineers for America is a new group, just recently formed:

"to enter the political debate when the nation's leaders systematically ignore scientific evidence and analysis, put ideological interest ahead of scientific truths, suppress valid scientific evidence and harass and threaten scientists for speaking honestly about their research."

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Friday, October 6, 2006

The EU is considering banning embalming fluid which contains formaldehyde, a potent carcinogen. Proponents of the ban are concerned about the chemical’s potential to leach into the ground. The Wall Street Journal writes today of the resistance to the ban from some folks in Ireland, as well as the U.S.-based Dodge Company that manufactures most of the stuff. The Green Burial Council, committed to encouraging greener burial processes, views embalming as an anachronism for which “there's not one shred of evidence that suggests [it] provides any public health benefits.” The Irish who oppose the ban argue that the ban is an obstacle to holding a proper Irish wake, which can take several days to plan and orchestrate.

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Friday, October 6, 2006

 

2.6 billion people who lack basic access to sanitation are located mainly in Africa and Asia, estimates UNICEF's report. An estimated 425 million children don't have access to purified water, while over 980 million total don't have sanitation.

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