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Environmental connections to public health >>

The Latest from EnviroBlog

Tuesday, October 24, 2006

Today’s USA Today profiles (on the front page no less) EWG intern Alex Wells. According to USAT Alex may be pretty typical of Generation Y. Research suggests she and other millennials — those in their mid-20s and younger — are civic-minded and socially conscious.

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Tuesday, October 24, 2006

Multiple recent articles from news websites to be found within.

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Monday, October 23, 2006

Check out Radar Online's caustic and amusing rankings of America's Dumbest Congressmen.

Monday, October 23, 2006

Several years ago, concerned by the time and energy South African women spent fetching water from distant, often polluted sources, Trevor Fields decided to do something. Fields teamed up with an inventor to produce the PlayPump—a children’s merry-go-round, that when spun, pumps water from below ground to an above-ground storage tank. Each PlayPump costs about $14,000, but operating costs are nil since the pumps are run by kidpower.

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Friday, October 20, 2006

While industry and government officials debate the safety of nanotech, 256 popular products have already been identified where nanomaterials are listed as ingredients. Products include eye liner, moisturizer, bronzer, lip balm and sunscreen.

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Thursday, October 19, 2006

Chevy is back it at with another ridiculous ad strategy. Since their "make your own" Tahoe advert was a flop, Chevy and John "whatever-my-middle-name-is-today" Mellencamp have teamed up to try a new angle--capitalizing on American icons like Rosa Parks and MLK, and tragedies like 9/11 and Katrina, to sell their new Silverados.

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Thursday, October 19, 2006

Multiple articles from recent news.

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Thursday, October 19, 2006

MP%20FARM%20POST.pngToday Michelle Perez, Senior Analyst for Agriculture & Natural Resources at EWG, enlightens us about the results and implications of the survey The 2007 Farm Bill: U.S. producer preferences for agricultural, food, and public policy:
 

Wednesday, October 18, 2006

Today As You Sow and the Container Recycling Institute released a report card on the performance of major U.S. beverage companies on recycling and recycled content in their containers. They found that except for Coke and Pepsi, the industry gets poor or failing grades.

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Wednesday, October 18, 2006

"A team of researchers who studied the occupations of nearly all the Windsor, Ont., women who developed breast cancer in a period from 2000 to 2002 found they were about three times more likely to have worked on farms than women who didn't have the disease."

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Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Ex-FDA chief Lester Crawford pled guilty today to being the latest administration scumbag caught owning shares of companies he regulated. Crawford was forced out last year, after a grand total of two months as Food and Drug Administration Commissioner. (He was acting director for three years before that, because the Senate didn’t want to confirm him.)

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Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Over 100 accidental ingestions of Colgate-Palmolive’s multi-use cleaner Fabuloso have prompted an article in the journal Pediatrics. Those who drank the cleaning product (40% of whom are over 12), presumably did so because it’s sold in a color and packaging that resembles a sports drink. In honor of their 100th accidental poisoning, Colgate-Palmolive has decided to redo the Fabuloso label to more clearly indicate the product’s intended use.

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Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Today the New York Times reports some disturbing news about certain drugs and cosmetics causing preschoolers to go into puberty. In one case, a girl and her brother--whose father had been using a testosterone skin cream--started growing pubic hair just from skin contact with their father. Her brother also developed some aggressive behavior problems. The article cites some 1998 cases of early breast development in young girls brought on by a shampoo which contained estrogen and placental extract.

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Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Currently, about 40 million acres of rainforest are lost annually, even though they are home to to five to ten million plant and animal species. In addition to their role as diverse habitats, rainforests also help mitigate the effects of global warming by absorbing greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide.

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Monday, October 16, 2006

We learn today, via Effect Measure and DemFromCT at DailyKos, that the CDC has started a blog of their own, with the realization that "new media" is a good vehicle to help advance discussion of federal health policy.

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Monday, October 16, 2006

Check out this 40 second clip of Minnesota Senator Michele Bachmann calling climate change science into question as her audience laughs in her face.

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Friday, October 13, 2006

Multiple articles from recent news.

Thursday, October 12, 2006

Isn't this MUCH better? Thanks to EWG designer extraordinaire, Carrie Gouldin, we no longer look like a spam blog. In fact, I'd have to say (in my completely impartial opinion, of course) that we've now got one of the best designs out there. We're still making small tweaks, so please comment or email us if you have trouble with anything, or if something just looks plain wrong on your browser.

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Thursday, October 12, 2006

A new study of over 1,000 pregnant Michigan women has found that those with hair samples containing high levels of mercury are three times more likely to give birth prematurely. The study acknowledges that pregnant women often receive mixed messages about fish- while they can benefit from unsaturated fatty acids and protein, they are also exposed to hazardous mercury.

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Thursday, October 12, 2006

new study of over 1,000 pregnant Michigan women has found that those with hair samples containing high levels of mercury are three times more likely to give birth prematurely. While this is the first community-based study to investigate the dangers of mercury for pregnant women, it is only one of many to call the into question the risks pregnant women face from mercury exposure.

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