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Environmental connections to public health >>

The Latest from EnviroBlog

Monday, November 6, 2006

Are weather-related complications, such as droughts, really 'disasters' if they seem to happen year after year? Many farmers who receive these payments seem to think so, but EWG President and farm policy expert Ken Cook challenges that notion with his response to a poorly-researched Aberdeen American editorial.

Friday, November 3, 2006

In a step toward creating a peaceful union between farming and conservation, the Ballance Farm Environment Awards of New Zealand announced their acceptance of nominations for farmers who have done the most toward sustainable farming this year.

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Friday, November 3, 2006

Several news articles and their summaries within.

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Thursday, November 2, 2006

A new website by Harvard School of Public Health lets visitors tally their risk for several types of cancer, as well as heart disease, osteoporosis, diabetes, and stroke. Users input their age and gender and some more specific info about their lifestyle to get personalized risk level comparisons for a given disease against those of others in the same demographic.

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Thursday, November 2, 2006

Today's Baraboo (Wisconsin) News Republic gives plain-English descriptions of federal farm subsidies. The piece makes a pretty good case for conservation payments.

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Wednesday, November 1, 2006

That's right. Turning everything off when you leave the house isn't enough. To ensure that you aren't losing energy to phantom currents, either unplug devices when not in use or use power strips that can accommodate many plugs and cut energy flow to them through one main switch. And watch out for those cell phone chargers. Only 5% of the power drawn by cell phone chargers is actually used to charge phones. The other 95% is consumed when the charger is left plugged in with no phone attached to it.

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Monday, October 30, 2006

California is years behind schedule in setting safety standards for rocket fuel waste in drinking water, and now there's evidence that the proposed standard is too weak to protect pregnant women and their unborn babies. A new study by the Centers for Disease Control found that drinking water with just 5 parts per billion of perchlorate could disrupt thyroid hormones in women of childbearing age, and for 1 in 10 the condition would be serious enough that they'd need treatment to protect their babies from IQ and developmental deficits.

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Monday, October 30, 2006

Got cockroaches? Grist's Umbra gives us a few eco-friendly tips for getting rid of the unwanted guests. I'm definitely bookmarking this one as I have little idea what crawlers may await me in the historic rowhouse I just moved into, and my roommate who works for Beyond Pesticides would exterminate me if I let the landlord spray the nasty stuff.

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Monday, October 30, 2006

Several articles from recent news contained within.

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Friday, October 27, 2006

Industry and trade groups are suing to overturn San Francisco's newest ordinance aimed at protecting the city's toddlers from a suite of chemicals shown to cause cancer and hormone disruption in laboratory trials. The ban prohibits the sale and manufacture of toys and products intended for children under the age of 3, if they contain phthalates compounds used to soften plastics containing PVC and Bisphenol A.

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Thursday, October 26, 2006

Last month we reported on the outrage of some distinguished Harvard alums over a suspiciously closed-door “investigation” that cleared Harvard professor Chester Douglass of charges that he covered up links—revealed by federally-funded research—between fluoridated water and bone cancer in boys. He's the same Harvard doc who is a paid consultant for Colgate toothpaste, which is clearly pro-fluoride, and who donated $1 million to the university's dental school in 2001.

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Thursday, October 26, 2006

Multiple recent news articles within.

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Wednesday, October 25, 2006

Multiple recent articles within.

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Tuesday, October 24, 2006

Today’s USA Today profiles (on the front page no less) EWG intern Alex Wells. According to USAT Alex may be pretty typical of Generation Y. Research suggests she and other millennials — those in their mid-20s and younger — are civic-minded and socially conscious.

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Tuesday, October 24, 2006

Multiple recent articles from news websites to be found within.

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Monday, October 23, 2006

Check out Radar Online's caustic and amusing rankings of America's Dumbest Congressmen.

Monday, October 23, 2006

Several years ago, concerned by the time and energy South African women spent fetching water from distant, often polluted sources, Trevor Fields decided to do something. Fields teamed up with an inventor to produce the PlayPump—a children’s merry-go-round, that when spun, pumps water from below ground to an above-ground storage tank. Each PlayPump costs about $14,000, but operating costs are nil since the pumps are run by kidpower.

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Friday, October 20, 2006

While industry and government officials debate the safety of nanotech, 256 popular products have already been identified where nanomaterials are listed as ingredients. Products include eye liner, moisturizer, bronzer, lip balm and sunscreen.

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Thursday, October 19, 2006

Chevy is back it at with another ridiculous ad strategy. Since their "make your own" Tahoe advert was a flop, Chevy and John "whatever-my-middle-name-is-today" Mellencamp have teamed up to try a new angle--capitalizing on American icons like Rosa Parks and MLK, and tragedies like 9/11 and Katrina, to sell their new Silverados.

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Thursday, October 19, 2006

Multiple articles from recent news.

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