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Environmental connections to public health >>

The Latest from EnviroBlog

Monday, March 19, 2007

A recently released MIT report found that coal contributes more to global carbon dioxide emissions than any other energy source. Coal’s high carbon to hydrogen ratio makes it a larger CO2 polluter per unit of energy than other fossil fuels. Coal combustion also emits a variety of other pollutants, such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, particulates, and mercury.

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Monday, March 19, 2007

EWG is about to embark on a new study about bottled water--where it comes from, how it's "purified," and if it's even worth the expense. A big part of this project is just compiling the data, so we need your help to gather information from the labels of whatever bottled water you have at hand.

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Wednesday, March 14, 2007

There’s one Lord, but not just one issue. I am as much against abortion as Jim Dobson and the others, but I want that baby to live in a healthful environment, inside the womb as well as outside of the womb.

Tuesday, March 13, 2007

The following post is from our guest blogger, who prefers to remain anonymous to protect his professional affiliation: It turns out that someone finally looked and found that not only are antioxidents not helpful, but some may be harmful. This really underscores the problems of trusting partial science and also speaks to problems with how sloppy reporting by medical journalists can lead to widespread public mis-information.

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Monday, March 12, 2007

By now you've likely seen some of the national attention EWG’s recent report about Bisphenol A (BPA), an ingredient used in plastic bottles and in the lining of food cans, has generated. BPA has been shown to be toxic in low doses, and has been linked to breast and prostate cancer, diabetes and infertility. Pregnant women and infants are most at-risk, and yet there are currently no safety standards established.

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Wednesday, March 7, 2007

Chicago Tribune health columnist, Julie Deardorff, blogs about bispheniol A in 'Toxic baby bottles.' The article that prompted Julie's post was published on February 27th. Since then Natural Baby and their manufacturer, Evenflo have sold out of glass baby bottles and nipples. The number of glass baby bottle orders has increased by 1000% within the last week.

Wednesday, March 7, 2007

The economic viability of alternative energy looks more promising than ever. According to a new report by Clean Edge—a research and consulting firm specializing in clean technology—annual revenues for solar, wind, biofuels, and fuel cell technology increased by 39 percent in 2006. The industry value of these four markets totaled $55.4 billion in 2006, with industry growth expected to quadruple in the next ten years.

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Wednesday, March 7, 2007

A 2006 client list for Sciences International, the consulting firm that is running CERHR. Read it and you will notice that it is essentially a who's who of the chemical industry (and their trade associations).

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Wednesday, March 7, 2007

According to EWG VP of Research, Jane Houlihan, would be for The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to prohibit Sciences International's involvement in the evaluation of any chemicals related to its industry clients and develop a conflict of interest policy for all contractors.

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Wednesday, March 7, 2007

Pressure and publicity from EWG, has prompted the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences announced Monday that Sciences International has been temporarily removed from overseeing the Institute's bisphenol A evaluation while the company's ties to chemical manufacturers are investigated.

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Tuesday, March 6, 2007

China is expected to surpass the United States as the largest global polluter of greenhouse gases within the next two years. The San Francisco Chronicle states that the country’s fossil fuel consumption increased by 9.3 percent in 2006, as compared to an annual increase of about 1.2 percent in the United States. Inefficient coal power plants supply about 70 percent of the country’s energy output.

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Tuesday, March 6, 2007

 

Used cooking oil may find a second life in cosmetic products. via New Scientist. (5 Mar 2007)

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Friday, March 2, 2007

Yesterday I pointed you to the newest EWG investigation exposing the dubious relationship between the Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR) — an agency under the auspices of the National Institutes of Health — and the consulting firm Sciences International (SI).

Thursday, March 1, 2007

A federal agency that evaluates the causes of birth defects and other reproductive problems is run by a consulting firm with ties to companies that make chemicals the agency is charged with reviewing, an EWG investigation found. Chairs of House and Senate Committees are investigating. [more]

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Wednesday, February 28, 2007

Providing parking facilities and addressing traffic congestion imposes significant costs to universities across the United States. That’s why many campuses have implemented Transportation Demand Management programs to discourage the use of single-occupant personal vehicles.

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Wednesday, February 28, 2007

Providing parking facilities and addressing traffic congestion imposes significant costs to universities across the United States. That’s why many campuses have implemented Transportation Demand Management programs to discourage the use of single-occupant personal vehicles.

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Tuesday, February 27, 2007

In his State of the Union Address last January, President Bush vowed to decrease gasoline consumption in the US transportation sector. “Let us build upon the work we’ve done and reduce gasoline usage in the United States by 20 percent in the next 10 years . . . To reach this goal, we must increase the supply of alternative fuels, by setting a mandatory fuels standard to require 35 billion gallons of renewable and alternative fuels in 2017.”

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Thursday, February 22, 2007

NPR reports on the hidden hazards of compact fluorescent light bulbs. CFLs contain trace amounts of mercury that can be released when the bulbs break. The concern is not for consumers but rather those who handle our solid waste. As recycling programs for CFLs are not yet in place in many cities, some people are tempted to toss them into their municipal trash, where invariably they will break and leave residues on trash cans, dumpsters, and trash trucks. Bad idea.

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Wednesday, February 21, 2007

The vapor is 1,000 times the atmospheric mercury limits imposed by the EPA.

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