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Environmental connections to public health >>

The Latest from EnviroBlog

Friday, January 12, 2007

Publishers Penguin and Rodale have announced today a joint effort to publish an adaptation of Al Gore’s book AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH: THE CRISIS OF GLOBAL WARMING for young readers.

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Thursday, January 11, 2007

When Tony Blair says that he will be 'offsetting' his family's recent Florida trip, he is referring to a system in which an individual pays a [usually for-profit] company to zero out all or part of the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of a party, by reducing the emissions—or increasing the CO2 absorption—of another party.

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Wednesday, January 10, 2007

Dell has a new program to plant a tree for each computer it sells, saying it could offset CO2 emissions from the machines. I’m not sure who did the math on that, but the program is commendable nonetheless. More impressive is Dell’s free recycling of all computers, monitors, printers, and other gadgets without requiring the purchase of a newer model.

Wednesday, January 10, 2007

Al Gore’s Nashville-based Climate Project expects to train well over 1,000 volunteers to be effective messengers of climate change science through slideshow presentations. Al's use of the slideshow turned into a film you may have heard about. According to Gannett, a recent training included teachers, doctors, a meteorologist, ministers, Wal-Mart employees, architects, retirees, veterans, financiers and actress Cameron Diaz.

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Tuesday, January 9, 2007

An Intellichoice.com study finds that hybrid cars, whose fuel efficiency alone may not justify their higher initial purchase price, are in fact more economical in the long run. When you factor in financing, fuel, insurance, state taxes and license fees, repairs, maintenance and depreciation, over five years a Prius will cost $13,408 less than a similar-size non-hybrid sedan.

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Monday, January 8, 2007

After pressure from EWG and an ABC News story, EPA has announced it will “deny all applications for registration of acid copper chromate, known as ACC, as a wood preservative pesticide intended for residential use.”

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Monday, January 8, 2007

In Chemical & Engineering News’ Point/Counterpoint an American Chemistry Council (ACC) representative and a University of Massachusetts professor debate the adequacy of current chemical regulation in the U.S. One of the most shocking facts in the article comes right in the introduction...

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Friday, January 5, 2007

Just before Christmas, President Bush signed the Combating Autism Act of 2006. On December 21st, a largely supported act that will give more money to research and education on autism was enacted. The bill authorizes nearly $1 billion for research and education on autism over the next five years, a more than 50% increase.

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Thursday, January 4, 2007

On January 19, EPA will decide whether to allow unrestricted use of a potent human carcinogen in lumber sold at hardware and home improvement stores. Hexavalent chromium–the "Erin Brockovich" chemical–is a key ingredient in a wood preservative the chemical industry is lobbying hard to keep on the market, before release of a major cancer study on the chemical expected later this year.

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Thursday, January 4, 2007

The New York Times' most emailed article of the day reports on the absurd marketing claims for cosmetic skin creams and the high prices the products demand. A Manhattan dermatologist recommends reducing your daily skin care routine to two simple ingredients: gentle soap and sunscreen, and a third product only for specific skin needs like acne or pigment spots. Avoid the high-priced brands, because no research suggests more expensive products are any better.

Thursday, January 4, 2007

Doctors at the Mayo Clinic heard a dire warning on the possible link between a widely used weed-killer and cancer. In a forum usually reserved for medical researchers, amphibian endocrinologist Tyrone Hayes of UC Berkeley talked about frogs, but his message was one with direct implications for human medicine. Exposure to the herbicide, Atrazine, results in what amounts to chemical castration.

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Wednesday, January 3, 2007

Two former high-level Bush bureaucrats are stepping back through the revolving door to resume their crusade on behalf of industry and against pesky regulations.

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Tuesday, January 2, 2007

 

Happy new year and welcome back to Enviroblog--you are reading the first post of 2007! I’ve never been big on New Year's resolutions but this year I’m making one I know I’ll follow through with and that will benefit both my wallet and the earth--changing the remainder of the incandescent bulbs in my house to compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs).

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Wednesday, December 20, 2006

Today, Wall Street Journal health reporter Tara Parker-Pope discloses her favorite home health references worth buying in print. I wish I could repost Tara’s descriptions of each book, but WSJ gets a little upset about that sort of thing—instead I’ll link you to the Amazon description of each of her top picks.

Tuesday, December 12, 2006

The Combating Autism Act of 2006, unanimously passed by the Senate in August, passed in the House on Friday. The bill, sponsored by Representative Mary Bono (R-CA) and Senator Rick Santorum (R-PA), will award research grants, education on autism and statewide autism screening, diagnosis, and intervention programs and systems.

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Tuesday, December 12, 2006

EPA's new system for measuring fuel efficiency should bring cars’ advertised MPG closer to their actual gas mileage. At present, fuel efficiency testing is not done under real world driving conditions, so the sticker numbers represent inflated fuel mileage.

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Monday, December 11, 2006

Feel guilty about those documents you print out, only to be read once and then tossed? Not guilty enough to strain your eyes reading every last word from your computer screen? Xerox Corporation thinks the answer may lie in “erasable paper”—a printing technology still in early R & D, which relies on specific wavelengths of light to print images that fade completely in 16-24 hours leaving blank paper for reuse. If the technology proves commercially viable it should drastically offset the amount of paper going to waste. According to Xerox, two out of every five pages are read only once before being trashed or recycled.

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Friday, December 8, 2006

New players in the farm subsidy debate could have a dramatic impact on the 2007 federal Farm Bill. While farm subsidies have traditionally protected commodity crops, like cotton and corn, produce farmers are pushing for their cut. This is like the tectonic plates of farm policy shifting, because you have a completely new player coming in and demanding money, said EWG President Kenneth A. Cook to Alexei Barrionuevo of the New York Times.

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Friday, December 8, 2006

Battery makers and lead smelters have been lobbying the Bush administration to roll back standards that keep lead out of gasoline and their efforts may prove successful for industry, that is. According to a statement released by the EPA earlier this week, the agency is considering dropping the lead limits in light of " the significantly changed circumstances since lead was listed in 1976" as an air pollutant.

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Thursday, December 7, 2006

"Neighborhood activists from California to Washington, D.C., are using a growing body of research on how pollutants exacerbate illness to block the building of facilities, relocate residents from contaminated communities and gain other concessions from large firms." [ LinkUSA Today ]

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