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Environmental connections to public health >>

The Latest from EnviroBlog

Thursday, February 8, 2007

Last night I watched the agricultural documentary How to Save the World. The film follows New Zealand bio-dynamic farmer Peter Proctor to India where he works with farmers to transition from chemical intensive agriculture to bio-dynamic farming methods which combine spiritual and holistic practices with organic agriculture to operate
a farm as a closed self-nourishing system.

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Wednesday, February 7, 2007

Brazilian President Luis Inacio Lula da Silva has stepped up his allegations against developed countries, demanding that they take a larger role against climate change. President Lula’s accusations followed UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon’s announcement that poor nations will be the most affected by climate change.

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Wednesday, February 7, 2007

 

"I want to send a clear signal to EPA and to this administration: We are watching. No longer will EPA rollbacks quietly escape scrutiny."

--California Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer warning EPA administrator Stephen Johnson over rules changes that could limit the input of scientific advisers into agency decisions and reduce public access to information about toxic substances in communities.

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Monday, February 5, 2007

Tomorrow night, NBC will air “Loophole,” an episode on the crime drama Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, which focuses on the controversial EPA rule allowing intentional dosing of people with pesticides.

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Friday, February 2, 2007

American Enterprise Institute (AEI), the Exxon-funded think tank, is now offering scientists $10,000 to cast doubts on a report by the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). According to The Guardian, the report is widely regarded as the most comprehensive review yet of climate change science.

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Thursday, February 1, 2007

Yesterday I posted about Michael Pollan's essay Unhappy Meals for New York Times Magazine, in which he promotes eating whole foods rather than food products and raises doubts about scientists’ who give diet recommendations based on 'nutrients' out of context from the 'foods' in which we should be eating them.

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Wednesday, January 31, 2007

In New York Times Magazine, Michael Pollan lays his framework for why Americans are so confused about proper nutrition and what to eat. Pollan argues that confusion about food is job security for the food industry, nutritional science, and journalists. He cites some interesting examples of industry influence over nutrition information, taking us back to 1977 when the Senate Select Committee on Nutrition was bullied by the meat and dairy industries to change the wording of their new dietary guidelines from “eat less red meat and dairy products” to “choose meat, poultry, and fish that will reduced saturated-fat intake.”

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Monday, January 29, 2007

While many scientists believe that most nanomaterials will ultimately prove to be benign, ETC Group -- which has called for a moratorium on the marketing of nanoproducts until more safety studies are done -- believes in erring on the side of caution.

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Monday, January 29, 2007

Planning a large event like a wedding is a unique opportunity to make decisions can dramatically reduce your toll on the environment. Joe Carrick and Jessica Randall, newlyweds featured in today’s Independent, greened their big day with conflict-free rings, carbon offsets for all their guests’ travel arrangements, low air-mile flowers and food, and envelope-free recycled invitations. The couple also requested donations to Oxfam in lieu of gifts.

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Friday, January 26, 2007

"No you will not teach or show that propagandist Al Gore video to my child, blaming our nation -- the greatest nation ever to exist on this planet -- for global warming," Hardison wrote in an e-mail to the Federal Way School Board.

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Thursday, January 25, 2007

The world watched in awe and excitement as President Bush outlined his new concepts of global warming and strategies to battle it during his State of the Union address Tuesday night. While the responses varied from optimistic to skeptical, the resounding conclusion was “finally!”

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Thursday, January 25, 2007

Two years of record-high gasoline prices have forced auto-crazed Americans to do something they haven't done in more than two decades: Drive less.

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Thursday, January 25, 2007

 

Today North Jersey's The Record highlights some salient observations illuminating the reality behind Bush's ethanol proposal. Eric DeGesero, executive VP of the New Jersey Fuel Merchants Association, wants to remind us that putting more corn into fuel production could raise the cost of America’s corn-intensive diet (though something tells me Mr. DeGesero should visit a nutritionist).

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Wednesday, January 24, 2007

In the State of the Union address, in addition to tougher mileage standards, President Bush called for increased reliance on renewable fuels, namely ethanol. The corn-based fuel additive, which has gained notoriety as of late, is far from a panacea for the environment or oil independence.

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Wednesday, January 24, 2007

The Washington Post will not let President Bush off the hook for his omissions in last nights State of the Union address.

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Wednesday, January 24, 2007

A new report by ConsumerLab.com finds only 10 of 21 products tested meet the claims on their labels. Several of the multivitamin products tested contained high levels of lead, including one women's multivitamin that contained 15.3 micrograms of lead per daily dose--more than 10 times the amount of lead allowed without a warning label in the state of California.

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Tuesday, January 23, 2007

Like a barnyard sow basking in attention at a county fair, the farm bill -- that monstrously complex five-year plan for federal agriculture policy -- has suddenly gained a high profile.

Monday, January 22, 2007

The House has taken a strong step toward cleaner energy by passing the Creating Long-Term Energy Alternatives for the Nation (CLEAN) Act. The CLEAN Act will shift nearly $14 billion in tax breaks for oil and natural gas companies to renewable fuels and energy efficiency programs.

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Monday, January 22, 2007

According to Seattle Post-Intelligencer, a man claiming to represent the Fallen Firefighters Foundation gave testimony against a PBDE bill. It was revealed that he worked for Ameribrom, a PBDE manufacturer. Shameless!

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Monday, January 22, 2007

New research confirms that people can take up brominated flame retardants (PBDEs) from the dust in their homes.

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