Sign up to receive email updates, action alerts, health tips, promotions to support our work and more from EWG. You can opt-out at any time. [Privacy]

 

enviroblog

Environmental connections to public health >>

The Latest from EnviroBlog

Tuesday, March 27, 2007

In my inaugural post, I wrote that the integrity and independence of the $500 million biofuels research partnership between BP (formerly British Petroleum) and UC Berkeley would depend on whether the university "can build in rigorous safeguards against corporate influence." Too late.

Key Issues: 
Tuesday, March 27, 2007

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is wary of the President's ethanol plans and warns of increased food costs and the need for a broader approach to our energy crisis, with a greater focus on conservation. Editorial: The limits of ethanolMilwaukee Journal Sentinel. 25 Mar 2007

Key Issues: 
Monday, March 26, 2007

The London papers are nailing the British diplomat whose job it is to lobby other countries to reduce global warming gases – but whose frequent-flier lifestyle produces a staggering 22.3 tons of carbon pollution a year, 30 times more than the average Brit's.

Key Issues: 
Monday, March 26, 2007

What do carbon-sucking artificial trees, an ocean floor carpet of iron dust, a man-made sulfur volcano, and a global umbrella all have in common?

Key Issues: 
Monday, March 26, 2007

Wired.com's Patrick Di Justo gives us the breakdown of 11 different chemicals commonly found in shaving cream, and the functions they each serve. I've reprinted the full text below. To see what's in your shaving cream and how it stacks up to others out there vist EWG's Skin Deep Cosmetic Safety Database. Womens's shaving creams compared here.

Key Issues: 
Friday, March 23, 2007

Did you know that many cosmetics have a shelf life of only one year, and the applicators of some products, like eyeliner, need to be washed or discarded even more frequently? According to the FDA, failing to do so can lead to bacterial infection.

Key Issues: 
Thursday, March 22, 2007

I left the Smithsonian's IMAX Theater after seeing Hurricane on the Bayou wondering how the film's producers managed to make such a colorfully feel-good movie about the devastation of Katrina. The Washington Post's Philip Kennicott apparently had the same questions and went digging. Read what Philip found.

Key Issues: 
Thursday, March 22, 2007

Siel of Green LA Girl attended Food Fight: A Teach-in On the 2007 Farm Bill last night at Berkely, moderated by author and farm bill critic Michael Pollan.

Thursday, March 22, 2007

Question: There's an internet rumor that says you can check for lead in lipstick by rubbing a gold ring on the lipstick. If the lipstick turns black, it contains lead. Is there any truth to this?

Key Issues: 
Tuesday, March 20, 2007

Last month, when BP (formerly British Petroleum) announced a $500 million partnership with UC Berkeley for biofuels research, the company was hailed as a leader in pushing the oil industry toward cleaner energy. University officials were jubilant over the deal, which would establish Cal – and the Bay Area, where venture capitalists are funding energy startups at a level unseen since the early Web days – as a world center of alternative-energy research and development.

Key Issues: 
Monday, March 19, 2007

A recently released MIT report found that coal contributes more to global carbon dioxide emissions than any other energy source. Coal’s high carbon to hydrogen ratio makes it a larger CO2 polluter per unit of energy than other fossil fuels. Coal combustion also emits a variety of other pollutants, such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, particulates, and mercury.

Key Issues: 
Monday, March 19, 2007

EWG is about to embark on a new study about bottled water--where it comes from, how it's "purified," and if it's even worth the expense. A big part of this project is just compiling the data, so we need your help to gather information from the labels of whatever bottled water you have at hand.

Key Issues: 
Wednesday, March 14, 2007

There’s one Lord, but not just one issue. I am as much against abortion as Jim Dobson and the others, but I want that baby to live in a healthful environment, inside the womb as well as outside of the womb.

Tuesday, March 13, 2007

The following post is from our guest blogger, who prefers to remain anonymous to protect his professional affiliation: It turns out that someone finally looked and found that not only are antioxidents not helpful, but some may be harmful. This really underscores the problems of trusting partial science and also speaks to problems with how sloppy reporting by medical journalists can lead to widespread public mis-information.

Key Issues: 
Monday, March 12, 2007

By now you've likely seen some of the national attention EWG’s recent report about Bisphenol A (BPA), an ingredient used in plastic bottles and in the lining of food cans, has generated. BPA has been shown to be toxic in low doses, and has been linked to breast and prostate cancer, diabetes and infertility. Pregnant women and infants are most at-risk, and yet there are currently no safety standards established.

Key Issues: 
Wednesday, March 7, 2007

Chicago Tribune health columnist, Julie Deardorff, blogs about bispheniol A in 'Toxic baby bottles.' The article that prompted Julie's post was published on February 27th. Since then Natural Baby and their manufacturer, Evenflo have sold out of glass baby bottles and nipples. The number of glass baby bottle orders has increased by 1000% within the last week.

Wednesday, March 7, 2007

The economic viability of alternative energy looks more promising than ever. According to a new report by Clean Edge—a research and consulting firm specializing in clean technology—annual revenues for solar, wind, biofuels, and fuel cell technology increased by 39 percent in 2006. The industry value of these four markets totaled $55.4 billion in 2006, with industry growth expected to quadruple in the next ten years.

Key Issues: 
Wednesday, March 7, 2007

A 2006 client list for Sciences International, the consulting firm that is running CERHR. Read it and you will notice that it is essentially a who's who of the chemical industry (and their trade associations).

Key Issues: 
Wednesday, March 7, 2007

According to EWG VP of Research, Jane Houlihan, would be for The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to prohibit Sciences International's involvement in the evaluation of any chemicals related to its industry clients and develop a conflict of interest policy for all contractors.

Key Issues: 
Wednesday, March 7, 2007

Pressure and publicity from EWG, has prompted the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences announced Monday that Sciences International has been temporarily removed from overseeing the Institute's bisphenol A evaluation while the company's ties to chemical manufacturers are investigated.

Key Issues: 

Pages