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Environmental connections to public health >>

The Latest from EnviroBlog

Friday, September 1, 2006

Drug Firms Use Financial Clout To Push Industry Agenda at FDA: The Food and Drug Administration is bargaining with the pharmaceutical industry for an increase in fees, giving the industry a greater role in shaping the priorities of its regulator.

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Thursday, August 31, 2006

A study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition finds that drinking three to four cups of tea per day can reduce one’s chances of having a heart attack, and possibly help protect against some cancers. The study’s author, Carrie Ruxton of Kings College London, challenges the common perception of tea as dehydrating, insisting that tea rehydrates just as well as water does:

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Thursday, August 31, 2006

E-85 Mileage Loophole for Carmakers: Car companies promoting E-85 as an alternative to gasoline are getting credit from the government for nearly double the gas mileage their vehicles actually achieve, allowing manufacturers to sell more full-size SUVs and pickups while still meeting federal standards for average fuel economy.

Wednesday, August 30, 2006

The Washington Post reported on a report by the National Research Center for Women & Families showing that expert panels assembled by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are often biased towards approving new drugs.

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Wednesday, August 30, 2006

The proof is in the pudding, as the saying goes, and obviously pudding is safe to eat. Just call me or Bill Cosby - we can talk tapioca all day. Today's Salt Lake Tribune editorial insists that "Makers of dietary supplements should have to prove safety." Sounds obvious, but if it isn't food you eat or a drug you take, don't assume it's been proven safe.

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Wednesday, August 30, 2006

Multiple articles from recent news.

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Tuesday, August 29, 2006

California has proposed an enforceable limit of 6 parts per billion for perchlorate (rocket fuel) in drinking water--four times more stringent than the EPA's waste-site cleanup standard of 24 parts per billion. Currently, Massachusetts is the only state with a mandatory limit--2 ppb for perchlorate in drinking water. Enviro groups in California have been pushing for an even more stringent limit of 1 or 2 parts per billion, but have met resistance from the Pentagon and its contractors.

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Monday, August 28, 2006

Every time I fly I notice that just before we land, the attendant acknowledges over the loudspeaker that they know I had many choices when booking my flight, and they are glad I gave them my business. I like that.

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Friday, August 25, 2006

NPR is running two stories about antibiotics. One about scientists scraping the sea floor in search of new antibiotics that we have yet to develop resistance to. Researchers are finding that drug companies have little interest in financing the testing of their newly discovered anitbiotics, because they are more focused on drugs that people require daily for the rest of their lives, or performance-enhancing drugs.

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Friday, August 25, 2006

Environmental Science and Technology reports on a study finding high levels of pesticides in the children of immigrant farmworkers. Of the farmworkers studied, researchers found that "40% of the mothers and 30% of the fathers had not received training in pesticide handling, a violation of U.S. EPA regulations."

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Thursday, August 24, 2006

 

Quoted in an article for the Japan Times, Tony Clarke of the Polaris Institute articulates the cyclical risk of our obsession with bottled water: "The bottled-water industry's marketing of 'safe, clean water' undermines citizen's confidence in public water systems, and paves the way for the water companies to take over underfunded local utilities. In return, public willingness to pay premium prices for bottled water enables water-service corporations to establish a top-dollar price."

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Wednesday, August 23, 2006

Officials in Massachusetts have begun aerial fumigation of the Southestern part of the state with the pesticide Anvil. The enemy: mosquitos capable of carrying Eastern equine encephalitis, of which two cases have been reported in Massachusetts this year. [Boston Globe]

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Wednesday, August 23, 2006

Paul Watson's poignant reflections on the over-exploitation of our seas and the toxicity of today's catch. [New Zealand Herald]

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Tuesday, August 22, 2006

The London Sunday Times reports that Madonna has been "lobbying the government and nuclear industry over a scheme to clean up radioactive waste with a supposedly magic Kabbalah fluid." Both she and her husband, Guy Ritchie are promoting a water-based “mystical” liquid solution that has allegedly proved successful in neutralising dangerous nuclear waste in Ukraine. One official--presumably at British Nuclear Fuels-- had this to say about Madonna's proposal: “It was like a crank call . . . the scientific mechanisms and principles were just bollocks, basically.”

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Monday, August 21, 2006

Exactly one month from first joining MySpace.com, EWG has reached the milestone of making 100 "friends." We've been amazed to see how many individuals and other organizations have found us on MySpace given we never made any formal announcement that we had joined. Click here and become EWG's 101st friend! "EnviroGroups on MySpace?" (7/20/06)

Monday, August 21, 2006

New Research from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences suggests that the "fresh" smell of many air fresheners is a result of the ingredient1,4 dichlorobenzene (1,4 DCB) which has been found to impair lung function. 1,4 DCB is also found in toilet bowl cleaners, mothballs and various other "deodorizing" products. "The best way to protect yourself, especially children who may have asthma or other respiratory illnesses, is to reduce the use of products and materials that contain these compounds." [via Effect Measure]

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Monday, August 21, 2006

"The Clinton administration in 2000 set a goal to eliminate childhood lead poisoning by 2010. To achieve that, in the next two years the EPA would have to reduce the estimated cases to 90,000 from about 400,000 cases in 1999-2000." [Kansas City Star]

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Friday, August 18, 2006

Coca-Cola is hit by a hunger strike and college boycotts prostesting environmental and human rights abuses. Coca-Cola says it is a target only because it is the market leader. Funny--that reminds me of the McDonald's sign Seth Godin posted to his blog Wednesday: BIG COMAPANIES ARE EASY TARGETS SO THEY NEED HIGHER STANDARDS.

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Thursday, August 17, 2006

Several links for recent news.

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