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Environmental connections to public health >>

The Latest from EnviroBlog

Friday, July 21, 2006

 

Here are a few remaindered links to get you through the weekend:

In Did Al Get the Science Right? Der Spiegel surveys the scientific community for reactions to Al Gore's documentary, An Inconvenient Truth.

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Thursday, July 20, 2006

What do OceanaOxfam America, and Greenpeace all have in common? Well-among other things-they are all nonprofits that have tapped into the social networking world of MySpace.com to attract new supporters.

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Wednesday, July 19, 2006

Keith Good, president and editor of the popular subscription daily, FarmPolicy.com, is also the editor(or should I say "Chef") of Ag Policy Soup. Launched in March '06, the site publishes audio interviews with U.S. farm policy experts.

Wednesday, July 19, 2006

Today, the Post's farm policy investigators tell the story of a 2003 boondoggle in which massive stockpiles of powdered milk, intended for use as "drought relief," ended up being traded all over the U.S. and in Mexico for big profits.

Tuesday, July 18, 2006

The Post's Dan Morgan, Gilbert M. Gaul, and Sarah Cohen continue to expose some serious flaws with the 2002 Farm Bill today in three articles deatiling different aspects of farm subsidy waste. Today's three articles build on the authors' July 2nd and 3rd pieces Farm Program Pays $1.3 Billion to People Who Don't Farm and Growers Reap Benefits Even in Good Years

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Tuesday, July 18, 2006

Organic hot dogs, burgers, and milkshakes may soon be making their way to the streets of the Big Apple. According to Sustainable Industries Journal, activist Antonia Nagy is working on a business model that will put multiple street-vendor style food carts around New York, allowing a greater diversity of people exposure to organic food. Way to go, Antonia!

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Monday, July 17, 2006

Today, The L.A. Times reveals that consumers spend 10 billion dollars annually on bottled water which undergoes a far less scrupulous testing regimen than big-city tap water systems.

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Thursday, July 13, 2006

In a new study published in Environmental Science & Technology, researchers watched levels of plasticizing chemicals called phthalates ("THAH-lates") rise and fall in breast milk over a six-month period.

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Tuesday, July 11, 2006

The following editorial, written by Thomas Rowley of Rural Policy Research Institute, explains---in terms we can all understand--the ways we are linked to farm policy, and how the idea that farm subsidies "help farmers" is misleading.

Tuesday, July 11, 2006

Purdue University has agreed to host one of a series of debates on farm subsidies and the next farm bill that EWG president Ken Cook has proposed to former House Agriculture Committee Chairman Larry Combest. Professor Otto Doering, an internationally respected agricultural economist, policy expert and educator would be serving as moderator.

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Tuesday, July 11, 2006

Today the National Academy of Sciences released a report confirming that dioxin, the byproduct of several industries, is a potent carcinogen. In a 2005 investigation, Environmental Working Group (EWG) researchers tested the umbilical cord blood of 10 newborn babies, and found that all of them had dioxins in their blood from the moment they were born.

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Monday, July 10, 2006

Purdue University has offered to host one of a series of debates on farm subsidies and the next farm bill that EWG president Ken Cook has proposed to former House Agriculture Committee Chairman Larry Combest. Professor Otto Doering, an internationally respected agricultural economist, policy expert and educator has agreed to serve as moderator.

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Friday, July 7, 2006

Environmental Working Group president, Ken Cook, has challenged former House Agriculture Committee Chairman, Larry Combest (R-TX), to a series of nationwide debates on 'agriculture policy, including the purposes and impacts of farm subsidies, agricultural trade, conservation, rural development, and the shape of the next farm bill.'

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Wednesday, July 5, 2006

As many of us celebrated the 50th birthday of our nation's highway system and the 230th birthday of America with a roadtrip, it's a good time to ask how we plan to get around for the next fifty years. Even greenies like me are not going to stop driving, so as a nation we'd better figure out how to stabilize gas prices.

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Thursday, June 29, 2006

Dell is expanding its services to include free recycling of any of their computers, regardless of whether its being replaced by a new Dell product. This goes one step beyond the policy of rival manufacturers'--Apple and Hewlett-Packard--policies, which generally leave the burden of shipping (about $30.00) on the customer.

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Monday, June 26, 2006

The BBC reports that a study commissioned by Greenpeace reveals consumers want more environmentally friendly PCs. What's so bad about computers? Well--they contain, among other nasty chemicals: lead, arsenic, fire retardants, cadmium, chromium, and mercury. And that's only in the final product--making the machine requires 10 times its weight in chemicals and fossil fuels.

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Friday, June 23, 2006

 

The World Health Organization has released a new report which strengthens the argument for increased controls on environmental pollution. Here are some of the key findings: 13 million deaths annually are due to preventable environmental causes.

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Thursday, June 22, 2006

As Reported in the L.A. Times, a recent study of teeneagers in Los Angeles and New York found that contaminants in indoor air made up 40-50% of participants' cancer risk. The two main culprits cited were Formaldehyde, from shelving, cabinets, and pressed-wood furnishings, and dichlorobenzene used in solid toilet deodorizers and mothballs.

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Wednesday, June 21, 2006

Who'da thunk. Tossing some vinegar into your washer's rinse cycle whiten your whites without making your clothes smell like a salad. Throwing in some baking soda can strengthen your laundry detergent so you can use less of it. And hydrogen peroxide?

Thursday, June 8, 2006

The magazine Consumer Reports is warning pregnant women not to eat any tuna at all because the government can't assure us that even supposedly-safe light tuna won't contain excessive levels of mercury, which harms developing brains.

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