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Environmental connections to public health >>

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Tuesday, May 8, 2012

The U.S. Department of Agriculture began testing fruits and vegetables for pesticide residues in 1991 after the public became concerned about their potential risks to children. 

Friday, May 4, 2012

As we change gears from the Hall of Shame and begin to focus on the upcoming annual EWG Sunscreen Database, EWG research was mentioned in a number of consumer health stories. The Washington Post ran a story on preserving the quality of the Potomac River, reminding readers to chose personal care products wisely as they end up down the drain. Forbes, Treehugger and Mother Nature News all mentioned our Hall of Shame, with the line of the week coming from Treehugger: "Environmental Working Group (EWG) to the rescue."

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Thursday, May 3, 2012

Nicholas Kristof a columnist for The New York Times, has written about the expanding evidence that hypospadias and other birth defects in people and wildlife that may be linked to the daily bombardment of endocrine disruptors in household goods, pesticides and other man-made products.

Friday, April 27, 2012

Renowned researcher and professor Tyrone Hayes has been studying the effects of the common herbicide atrazine for more than a decade. His findings contributed to the European Union's decision to ban this toxic endocrine disrupter.

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Friday, April 27, 2012

The "Hall of Shame" of the dirtiest cleaners from our upcoming EWG Cleaners Database was released Monday evening to our email list and selective media outlets. EWG supporter feedback was impressive - the two posts to our Facebook fans received over 450 "likes." The media took interest too, with Yahoo!, Time, and Good Magazine all running stories. What was one website's way to encourage its readers to use safer cleaning products? Urge them to utilize the help of a popular A-list celebrity.

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Last month, the New York Times published a story about my efforts when I was pregnant to rid my home of toxic chemicals. The story featured a photo of my 18-month-old daughter and recounted how I threw out a large pile of cosmetics, cleaners and other products that my research, using EWG's online Skin Deep Cosmetics Database, found to contain dangerous substances. While at the time I thought I was doing the right thing for my family, when I read readers' comments, I felt as if I were on Nickelodeon, in one of those scenes when an unsuspecting person has an entire bucket of green slime dumped on her head.

Monday, April 23, 2012

News coverage of EWG topics including cosmetics and household toxins appeared across the web from sites including the Los Angeles Times, Shine by Yahoo!, and Prevention. EWG released a statement on a finding from an independent science panel finding PFOA, an ingredient that has been used to make non-stick coatings and stain-resistant materials, is linked to testicular and kidney cancers.

Friday, April 13, 2012

A summary of a U.S. Geological Survey finding associating earthquakes with the oil and gas drilling process was mentioned by The Atlantic, and re-printed in Yahoo! Finance and SFist. Bill Allayaud was interviewed twice by different Fox News programs, and spoke with Alternet who did a long piece titled "Unregulated Fracking for Decades? Why California May Be a Disaster Waiting to Happen"

Monday, April 9, 2012

New online videos from a chemical agribusiness front group show conventional growers straining to convince consumers that it's just fine to eat bug killers and weed killers.

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Thursday, March 29, 2012

 

Our California fracking report continued to gain fantastic coverage this week with three large stories in Santa Cruz Weekly, Sacramento News and Review and Wines and Vines. Our president, Ken Cook, posted in Huffington Post on BPA in food packaging in anticipation of FDA's March 31 deadline to make a decision on the chemical. The agency made an announcement late today, Friday, stating it would continue the use of the chemical in food packaging. EWG's release criticizing the move was picked up by Forbes, Bloomberg and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

 
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Monday, March 26, 2012

Under mounting pressure from consumers, scientists, advocacy groups and lawsuits, the Food and Drug Administration is about to decide whether to ban the ubiquitous industrial chemical BPA (bisphenol-A) from food packaging, including infant formula and canned food.

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Friday, March 23, 2012

Our California fracking report continued to gain fantastic coverage this week with three large stories in Santa Cruz Weekly, Sacramento News and Review and Wines and Vines. Our president, Ken Cook, posted in Huffington Post on BPA in food packaging in anticipation of FDA's March 31 deadline to make a decision on the chemical. The agency made an announcement late today, Friday, stating it would continue the use of the chemical in food packaging. EWG's release criticizing the move was picked up by Forbes, Bloomberg and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

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Thursday, March 22, 2012

Polluted water resources. Compromised housing values. And now, earthquakes?  As companies increasingly rely on hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, to expand U.S. oil and gas operations, regulators are finally beginning to understand its potential impact on public health and the environment.

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Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Last week, the New York Times ran a D-1 story titled "Is It Safe to Play Yet?" on parents working to detoxify their homes, featuring EWG. On the same day, the Los Angeles Times ran a story on fracking in California, mentioning our recent report. On the cosmetics front, Self Magazine ran an interview they did with EWG senior scientist Olga Naidenko, PhD on healthier hair treatments. Here's a review of EWG in the media last week:

Monday, March 12, 2012

Here's a look at what the Environmental Working Group staff has been up to lately, and how our research, advocacy and commentary are being covered in the press.

Friday, March 9, 2012

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned this week that more than 35 imported skin creams, antiseptic soaps and anti-aging lotions have recently been tied to mercury poisoning that in some instances sent users to the hospital.  

 

Thursday, March 8, 2012

The maker of Brazilian Blowout -- one of numerous hair straighteners on the market containing formaldehyde, a known carcinogen -- is now required to provide health warnings on its product's packaging and website, revamp deceptive marketing practices and pay civil penalties under California consumer protection law. These measures are part of a settlement agreement between the Los Angeles-based company and California Attorney General Kamala Harris.

Tuesday, March 6, 2012

A few days ago two California-based environmental reporters for the Associated Press who had made major contributions to the issue and their profession were taken off the beat. In the entire state of California, there is now only one AP reporter whose full time on the environment.

Monday, March 5, 2012

In some states, oil and gas companies have begun to face (gasp!) some basic regulations, such as required reporting of where and when they hydraulically fracture (or "frack") wells, and even disclosure of the chemicals they use. But in California, drillers can do whatever they please, wherever they please.

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Thursday, March 1, 2012

New York is considering lifting its moratorium on hydraulic fracturing, an oil and gas drilling technology in which large volumes of water, sand and chemicals are injected into the ground at high pressure.

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