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Environmental connections to public health >>

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Tuesday, August 15, 2006

This month McDonald's is giving away toy Hummers, 42 million of them, in eight models and colors, with every Happy Meal or Mighty Kids Meal. That's right: The fast-food chain that helped make our kids the fattest on Earth is now selling future car buyers on the fun of driving a supersized, smog-spewing, gas-guzzling SUV originally built for the military. In response, EWG has teamed up with Hybridcars.com to create the Ronald McHummer Sign-O-Matic so you can tell us what you think of this misguided marriage of two icons of American excess.

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Tuesday, August 15, 2006

A survey this month by Baltimore City Health Commisioner, Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, found that 4 out of 17 samples of children's jewelry sold at area stores had dangerously high levels of lead.

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Monday, August 14, 2006

Hummer will be launching a new ad campaign today to remind consumers that they sell TWO models the H2 and the smaller, cheaper H3. Hummer feels they've been too long associated with the behemoth H2, so the new commercials, touting the smaller H3 and featuring some Belgian magician, will shock you with their impressive claims of 20 miles per gallon and only a $30,000 price tag.

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Friday, August 11, 2006

On August 2, an official from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) told the Senate's Environment and Public Works Committee that our nation's law governing industrial chemicals needs to be dramatically changed.

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Thursday, August 10, 2006

This summer, kids will be getting toy Hummers with their Happy Meals thanks to a new McDonald's promotion to bring “the fun and excitement of Hummer vehicles” to “McDonald’s youngest guests.” In a time of record gas prices, when even our oil-friendly leader has admitted that America is "addicted to oil," it seems a bit irresponsible for McDonald's to be advertising the Hummer to its youngest and most impressionable customers.

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Monday, August 7, 2006

Recently there's been plenty of debate within scientific, regulatory, and public health circles about the role of industry funding in scientific research and on government advisory panels--with robust arguments from each side. But almost everyone--including the FDA, the American Chemistry Council, and the Society of Toxicology agree on one point: full disclosure of professional associations and financial interests is the bare minimum necessary to safeguard the public interest.

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Thursday, August 3, 2006

In an L.A. Times editorial, conservative-supreme Jonah Goldberg states his case against farm subsidies. Why?

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Wednesday, August 2, 2006

On Sunday, the New York Times ran a piece on PZEV’s, or Partial Zero Emissions Vehicles. PZEV’s are poorly marketed versions of the most popular cars on the road. The difference? They have better pollution-control systems than their identical counterparts—so much better that PZEV’s are 70 percent cleaner than vehicles that already meet “low emissions” standards. Sounds a little strange?

Tuesday, August 1, 2006

The City Gas Guzzler, which we linked to last week, is drawing lots of comments on the Autoblog.

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Tuesday, August 1, 2006

 

Check out this FDA Centennial Anthem, written in honor of the big milestone: "One century past, a people's hope fulfilled By an act conceived for safe medicine and food Protecting rights that our founding fathers willed To life and liberty, to happiness pursued."

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Monday, July 31, 2006

The New York Times plugs EWG's Shopper's Guide:

If you would like to make sure your organic dollars are delivering on their promise, you can keep an eye on the Environmental Working Group’s site at www.ewg.org[...]
Monday, July 31, 2006

From the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on mercury in dental fillings: "...Mercury in its many forms is poisonous, especially to children and pregnant women. The most heinous problems are neurological ones, which can hurt children's ability to learn, even before they're born."

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Monday, July 31, 2006

This week the LA Times brings us Altered Oceans, a five-part multimedia expose on the crisis in our seas, and the implications of being at a "tipping point" in marine history.

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Friday, July 28, 2006

Several articles from recent news.

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Thursday, July 27, 2006

A new report from the World Health Organization reminds us that we can have too much of a good thing. The report states that 60,000 lives are claimed each year from excessive sun exposure, the majority of the deaths from skin cancers caused by UV radiation. What does the WHO say are the best ways to minimize your risk?

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Monday, July 24, 2006

Today Center for Science in the Public (CSPI) Interest hosted a public forum to discuss conflicts of interest on National Academy of Sciences (NAS) issue panels. CSPI's most notable finding was that out of 320 NAS issue panel committee members evaluated, 18% had "direct conflicts of interest " defined as "a direct and recent connection to a company or industry with a financial stake in the study outcome."

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Friday, July 21, 2006

 

Here are a few remaindered links to get you through the weekend:

In Did Al Get the Science Right? Der Spiegel surveys the scientific community for reactions to Al Gore's documentary, An Inconvenient Truth.

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Thursday, July 20, 2006

What do OceanaOxfam America, and Greenpeace all have in common? Well-among other things-they are all nonprofits that have tapped into the social networking world of MySpace.com to attract new supporters.

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Wednesday, July 19, 2006

Keith Good, president and editor of the popular subscription daily, FarmPolicy.com, is also the editor(or should I say "Chef") of Ag Policy Soup. Launched in March '06, the site publishes audio interviews with U.S. farm policy experts.

Wednesday, July 19, 2006

Today, the Post's farm policy investigators tell the story of a 2003 boondoggle in which massive stockpiles of powdered milk, intended for use as "drought relief," ended up being traded all over the U.S. and in Mexico for big profits.

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