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Environmental connections to public health >>

The Latest from EnviroBlog

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

I've signed up to ride in the five-day, 320-mile Climate Ride California 2011 in support of EWG. I have a personal goal of raising $2,700 by Tuesday, Sept. 20. Can you help me make this goal? A donation in any amount - $5 or $50 or whatever you can afford- will make a big difference.

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

When it comes to drilling in the Marcellus Shale, the natural gas industry leaves no stone unturned.

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Thursday, August 18, 2011

Even though toxic flame retardant chemicals were banned in 2006, pregnant women in California carry high levels of the hazardous substances in their blood, according to a new study by scientists at UC San Francisco's Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment.

Monday, August 15, 2011

People across the country are rightly concerned about natural gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing near their homes. Thanks to new technologies, the exploitation of shale gas formations has expanded rapidly and now accounts for nearly 30 percent of U.S. natural gas production.

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Friday, August 12, 2011

People across the country are rightly concerned about natural gas drilling and fracturing near their homes. Thanks to new technologies, the exploitation of shale gas formations has expanded rapidly and now accounts for nearly 30 percent of U.S. gas production.

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Thursday, August 11, 2011

In discussions of the causes of cancer, environmental exposures have long been the unloved stepchild. But that's changing.

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Monday, August 8, 2011

Across the nation, water agencies have conducted hundreds of voluntary tests for this pollutant in response to EWG's startling discovery in 2010 that chromium-6 contamination is widespread in Americans' water supplies.

Friday, August 5, 2011

Imagine, if you can: Nearly overnight, your water well begins producing slimy, off-color foul smelling and worse tasting water. It's unusable. You can't drink it. You can't bathe in it. You can't wash dishes or rinse produce. Your only option is to get clean water trucked in.

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Friday, July 29, 2011

new report from Government Accountability Office, Congress's investigative arm, shows that a number of states have made serious errors in tap water safety data reporting. GAO attributed the lapses to inadequate funding and oversight.

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Thursday, July 28, 2011

new report from Government Accountability Office, Congress's investigative arm, shows that a number of states have made serious errors in tap water safety data reporting. GAO attributed the lapses to inadequate funding and oversight.

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Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Recently, we took a look at the water-saving potential of residential "gray" water, which, naturally, leads people to wonder: Can I use this technology in my home, too?

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Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Government Accountability Office investigation released last week has found that the Environmental Protection Agency's efforts to protect drinking water and public health from dangerous contaminants are inadequate.

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Tuesday, July 19, 2011

The Safe Cosmetics Act of 2011, introduced June 24 by Reps. Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.), Ed Markey (D-Mass.) and Tammy Baldwin (D-Wisc.) has a simple aim: to give the federal Food and Drug Administration the authority to protect consumers from dangerous ingredients in cosmetics.

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Thursday, July 14, 2011

Is your reusable water bottle aluminum? In an effort to be more sustainable and protect my health, I made the switch from plastic water bottles to my reliable metal bottle that I carry with me every day. I thought this switch was a positive change, which is why I'm a little concerned to read headlines that "Metal Water Bottles May Leach BPA."

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Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Chemical-laden wastewater generated by a natural gas hydraulic fracturing operation killed more than half a stand of trees in a field study at the Monongahela National Forest, according to a new report from the U.S. Forest Service.

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Monday, July 11, 2011

When I was growing up in Pennsylvania, my mother used to admonish me to conserve water during droughts. "Turn off the faucet while you brush your teeth," she'd say, "and take a shorter shower." Most people have heard this advice. But is it the most effective way to reduce water use?

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Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Most people are - by now - well aware that overexposure to formaldehyde is unsafe. From the FEMA trailer fiasco (remember Katrina?) to the Obama administration's recent decision to classify formaldehyde as a known human carcinogen, it's hard to not know you should avoid formaldehyde-laced products.

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Most people are - by now - well aware that overexposure to formaldehyde is unsafe. From the FEMA trailer fiasco (remember Katrina?) to the Obama administration's recent decision to classify formaldehyde as a known human carcinogen, it's hard to not know you should avoid formaldehyde-laced products.

Monday, June 27, 2011

The natural gas industry has lost much support among adults who live in communities where fracking has left the water undrinkable and home values plummeting, but all is not lost.

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Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Following up on last week's contentious hearing in Washington, Pa., the U.S. Energy department has scheduled two all-day sessions for Tuesday, June 28, and Wednesday, July 13, to listen to people concerned about controversial hydraulic fracturing operations in the Appalachian shale gas fields.

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