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Environmental connections to public health >>

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Wednesday, August 2, 2006

On Sunday, the New York Times ran a piece on PZEV’s, or Partial Zero Emissions Vehicles. PZEV’s are poorly marketed versions of the most popular cars on the road. The difference? They have better pollution-control systems than their identical counterparts—so much better that PZEV’s are 70 percent cleaner than vehicles that already meet “low emissions” standards. Sounds a little strange?

Tuesday, August 1, 2006

The City Gas Guzzler, which we linked to last week, is drawing lots of comments on the Autoblog.

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Tuesday, August 1, 2006

 

Check out this FDA Centennial Anthem, written in honor of the big milestone: "One century past, a people's hope fulfilled By an act conceived for safe medicine and food Protecting rights that our founding fathers willed To life and liberty, to happiness pursued."

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Monday, July 31, 2006

The New York Times plugs EWG's Shopper's Guide:

If you would like to make sure your organic dollars are delivering on their promise, you can keep an eye on the Environmental Working Group’s site at www.ewg.org[...]
Monday, July 31, 2006

From the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on mercury in dental fillings: "...Mercury in its many forms is poisonous, especially to children and pregnant women. The most heinous problems are neurological ones, which can hurt children's ability to learn, even before they're born."

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Monday, July 31, 2006

This week the LA Times brings us Altered Oceans, a five-part multimedia expose on the crisis in our seas, and the implications of being at a "tipping point" in marine history.

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Friday, July 28, 2006

Several articles from recent news.

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Thursday, July 27, 2006

A new report from the World Health Organization reminds us that we can have too much of a good thing. The report states that 60,000 lives are claimed each year from excessive sun exposure, the majority of the deaths from skin cancers caused by UV radiation. What does the WHO say are the best ways to minimize your risk?

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Monday, July 24, 2006

Today Center for Science in the Public (CSPI) Interest hosted a public forum to discuss conflicts of interest on National Academy of Sciences (NAS) issue panels. CSPI's most notable finding was that out of 320 NAS issue panel committee members evaluated, 18% had "direct conflicts of interest " defined as "a direct and recent connection to a company or industry with a financial stake in the study outcome."

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Friday, July 21, 2006

 

Here are a few remaindered links to get you through the weekend:

In Did Al Get the Science Right? Der Spiegel surveys the scientific community for reactions to Al Gore's documentary, An Inconvenient Truth.

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Thursday, July 20, 2006

What do OceanaOxfam America, and Greenpeace all have in common? Well-among other things-they are all nonprofits that have tapped into the social networking world of MySpace.com to attract new supporters.

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Wednesday, July 19, 2006

Keith Good, president and editor of the popular subscription daily, FarmPolicy.com, is also the editor(or should I say "Chef") of Ag Policy Soup. Launched in March '06, the site publishes audio interviews with U.S. farm policy experts.

Wednesday, July 19, 2006

Today, the Post's farm policy investigators tell the story of a 2003 boondoggle in which massive stockpiles of powdered milk, intended for use as "drought relief," ended up being traded all over the U.S. and in Mexico for big profits.

Tuesday, July 18, 2006

The Post's Dan Morgan, Gilbert M. Gaul, and Sarah Cohen continue to expose some serious flaws with the 2002 Farm Bill today in three articles deatiling different aspects of farm subsidy waste. Today's three articles build on the authors' July 2nd and 3rd pieces Farm Program Pays $1.3 Billion to People Who Don't Farm and Growers Reap Benefits Even in Good Years

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Tuesday, July 18, 2006

Organic hot dogs, burgers, and milkshakes may soon be making their way to the streets of the Big Apple. According to Sustainable Industries Journal, activist Antonia Nagy is working on a business model that will put multiple street-vendor style food carts around New York, allowing a greater diversity of people exposure to organic food. Way to go, Antonia!

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Monday, July 17, 2006

Today, The L.A. Times reveals that consumers spend 10 billion dollars annually on bottled water which undergoes a far less scrupulous testing regimen than big-city tap water systems.

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Thursday, July 13, 2006

In a new study published in Environmental Science & Technology, researchers watched levels of plasticizing chemicals called phthalates ("THAH-lates") rise and fall in breast milk over a six-month period.

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Tuesday, July 11, 2006

The following editorial, written by Thomas Rowley of Rural Policy Research Institute, explains---in terms we can all understand--the ways we are linked to farm policy, and how the idea that farm subsidies "help farmers" is misleading.

Tuesday, July 11, 2006

Purdue University has agreed to host one of a series of debates on farm subsidies and the next farm bill that EWG president Ken Cook has proposed to former House Agriculture Committee Chairman Larry Combest. Professor Otto Doering, an internationally respected agricultural economist, policy expert and educator would be serving as moderator.

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Tuesday, July 11, 2006

Today the National Academy of Sciences released a report confirming that dioxin, the byproduct of several industries, is a potent carcinogen. In a 2005 investigation, Environmental Working Group (EWG) researchers tested the umbilical cord blood of 10 newborn babies, and found that all of them had dioxins in their blood from the moment they were born.

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