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Great Books Make Great Gifts: What EWG Is Reading

Tuesday, December 6, 2011

If there's one thing we at Environmental Working Group love, it's a good book - especially about the issues we work on. Honestly, there are so many good ones.

So when I started putting together my holiday shopping lists, I asked my coworkers for their recommendations. As I expected, the books they've been reading this year are as amazing as they are - I couldn't wait to share them with you.

Plus, if you shop for great books through our special Amazon links (below), your purchase will do some good because you'll be supporting EWG at the same time - no matter what you purchase.

Whether you're shopping for someone trying to live greener, an aspiring chef or a new parent, we've got you covered. I hope you find these suggestions as interesting and inspiring as I did.

Cookbooks:

Ken loves cooking from Sheryl Crow's If It Makes You Healthy: More Than 100 Delicious Recipes Inspired by the Seasons.

Director of Technology Chuq Yang makes dinner almost nightly from Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything, Completely Revised 10th Anniversary Edition: 2,000 Simple Recipes for Great Food.

Other favorites from our office chefs? Myra Goodman's The Earthbound Cook: 250 Recipes for Delicious Food and a Healthy Planet and Laurie David's The Family Dinner: Great Ways to Connect with Your Kids, One Meal at a Time.

Green living:

When our Social Media Manager Lisa Frack is getting ready for a special occasion, she turns to Corey Colwell-Lipson's Celebrate Green for fun and sustainable ideas.

With the love of good food and a good story in mind, Chief of Staff Heather White recommends Thomas McNamee's Alice Waters and Chez Panisse, the biography of Alice Waters.

Ken enjoyed reading Dr. Andrew Weil's latest, Spontaneous Happiness.

As EWG's Senior Vice President of Research and director of our Skin Deep Cosmetics Database, I recommend Stacy Malkan's Not Just a Pretty Face: The Ugly Side of the Beauty Industry for anyone who wants to know more about the safe cosmetics movement.

chasing molecules book for EB.jpgDirector of our California office and a Senior Scientist, Renee Sharp can't get enough of the science behind Elizabeth Grossman's Chasing Molecules: Poisonous Products, Human Health, and the Promise of Green Chemistry.

Editor-in-chief Elaine Shannon found Carol Deppe's The Resilient Gardener: Food Production and Self-Reliance in Uncertain Times to be a fascinating read by an expert gardener and scientist.

As a mom trying to raise her kids sustainably, Foundation Coordinator Nicole Oliver turns to Peggy O'Mara's Natural Family Living: The Mothering Magazine Guide to Parenting.

Healthy eating and food policy:

For an eye-opening look at the food industry and the healthy eating movement, Ken always recommends Marion Nestle's Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health.

Vice President for Media Relations Alex Formuzis loves Michael Pollan's newly illustrated Food Rules: An Eater's Manual.

Alan Bjerga's Endless Appetites: How the Commodities Casino Creates Hunger and Unrest got glowing reviews from both Press Secretary Sara Sciammacco and Senior Communications and Policy Advisor Don Carr.

Senior Food and Agriculture Analyst Kari Hamerschlag couldn't put down Oran Hesterman's Fair Food: Growing a Healthy, Sustainable Food System For All.

fuwl-book-cover-small.jpgSenior Scientist David Andrews discovered why there was so much media attention when he read Sarah Wu's Fed Up with Lunch: The School Lunch Project: How One Anonymous Teacher Revealed the Truth About School Lunches - And How We Can Change Them!

Legal Fellow Etan Yeshua - a true tomato lover - recommends Barry Estabrook's Tomatoland: How Modern Industrial Agriculture Destroyed Our Most Alluring Fruit.

With so much media attention on childhood nutrition, Director of Development Jocelyn Lyle picked up Susan Levine's School Lunch Politics: The Surprising History of America's Favorite Welfare Program.

With all these ideas, your holiday shopping is practically done! And don't forget to grab a good read for yourself - which topic are you ready to learn more about?

[Thanks to flickr and jimmiehomeschoolmom for the great holiday gifts pic]

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