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Environmental connections to public health >>

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Wednesday, October 19, 2005

The Bush administration continues to combat the country's energy problems with industry giveaways, now allowing oil and gas drilling permits on public lands to be issued without environmental reviews or citizen comment.

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Wednesday, October 19, 2005

Construction on 9,500 new oil and gas wells in western Colorado is creating erosion and runoff that's clogging towns' irrigation systems and raising cleanup costs.

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Tuesday, October 18, 2005

Grassroots opposition to proposals to fluoridate water supplies across the country are gathering community and state-level attention and support, a new piece in TIME Magazine shows.

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Thursday, October 13, 2005

Many baby and young children's products like teething rings, plastic and plush toys, clothing, and personal care products contain phthalates and fire retardants, a new study shows.

Tuesday, October 11, 2005

The LA Times has a funny piece about a band of subversive Parisian jokers terrorizing the SUV-driving population with deflated tires and mud-smeared windows.

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Tuesday, October 11, 2005

Using a line straight from the chemical industry's playbook, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger vetoed a bill that would have established the nation's first state biomonitoring program last weekend.

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Tuesday, October 11, 2005

The U.S. Forest Service has fired a 40-year employee after he filed a whistleblower complaint related to misuse of pesticides across several forests in Arizona and New Mexico. He said he was fired him because the Forest Service doesn't want controls over its pesticide use in public areas.

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Thursday, October 6, 2005

An October 6 investigation by the Christian Science Monitor finds that 27 states are taking the lead on environmental protection issues in cases where they feel the federal government is either acting wrongly, slowly or not at all. Will this trend become the norm?

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Wednesday, October 5, 2005

W.R. Grace strikes again, the Dallas Morning News reports, with news that up to 450 employees of the company's West Dallas plant and their families are at risk from asbestos-related illnesses.

Tuesday, October 4, 2005

San Francisco officials are looking at a proposal requiring trilingual signs in restaurants, stores and markets warning consumers of mercury in their fish. Mercury can cause neurological and developmental problems, with pregnant mothers, infants and children most at risk.

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Tuesday, October 4, 2005

Environmental Health Perspectives examines the possible connection between a startlingly low male birth rate and industrial pollution among a population of Native Americans in Ontario living right next to one of Canada's largest concentrations of chemical plants. The area is heavily polluted with PCBs, phthalates and dioxins, all known endocrine disruptors.

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Monday, October 3, 2005

Ag-Mart Produce, the giant Florida tomato grower, is eliminating the use of some pesticides linked to birth defects following a lawsuit involving three seriously deformed babies born to field workers.

Friday, September 30, 2005

Just before hunting season opens in Utah, state officials are warning hunters not to eat two types of ducks that feed on Great Salt Lake marhes because tests on the animals show dangerous levels of mercury in their flesh.

Friday, September 30, 2005

The National Institutes of Health are launching a study that will follow 100,000 American children from birth to adulthood in the hopes of pinning down possible environmental causes of many common diseases.

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Thursday, September 29, 2005

The Washington State Toxics Coalition and the Toxic-Free Legacy Coalition have started body burden testing on 10 people in the Puget Sound area, looking for pesticides, heavy metals, PCBs, fire retardants, phthalates and other toxics in their subjects' bodies.

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Wednesday, September 28, 2005

The Washington Post's Juliet Eilperin reports on a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study that shows that U.S. women living near a coast have higher levels than women living inland.

Tuesday, September 27, 2005

The New York Times has the article, but since they buried the lead, head over to Washington Monthly for the real story on Bush's speech - lip service to conservation efforts while Congress puts its muscle into more drilling.

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Tuesday, September 27, 2005

If you've ever been curious about why an environmental group like EWG has such an interest in farm subsidies, yesterday's Washington Post has the answer.

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Tuesday, September 27, 2005

W.R. Grace has taken the power of positive thinking too far, attempting to cure the Libby, Mont., residents the company knowingly poisoned for decades with toxic vermiculite just by saying it isn't so.

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Monday, September 26, 2005

After a local 15-year-old was hospitalized due to what doctors speculated was a reaction to pesticides on her soccer field, Peachtree City, Ga., has temporarily stopped spraying fields and is looking into organic options.

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