Bioavailability

Just because you’re eating a food doesn’t necessarily mean you’re taking full advantage of its nutritional properties.

In fact, bioavailability – the amount of a substance that our bodies absorb and actively use – is quite poor among many of the compounds suspected of playing key roles in reducing cancer risks.

Fortunately, food preparations and different pairings in meals can help improve how our bodies take advantage of the foods we eat. Use our table below to learn more. 

Carotenoids including lycopene and beta-carotene
Isothiocyanates
Anthocyanins
Melatonin
B vitamins
Vitamin D
Kaempferol
Luteolin
Naringenin
Astaxanthin
Eicosapentanoic acid (EPA)
Oleanolic acid
Curcumin
Lentinus edodes (lentinan)
Piperine
Zerumbone
gamma-Linolenic acid (GLA)
Resveratrol
Selenium
Carotenoids including lycopene and beta-carotene

FOOD SOURCES

Colorful fruits and vegetables: tomatoes (especially cooked), leafy greens, carrots, watermelon, papaya, grapefruit, peppers, guava, asparagus, purple cabbage, squash, green peas, broccoli, Brussels sprouts

BIOAVAILABILITY

Absorption requires some fat. As little as 3-5 grams will do, that's about a teaspoon or a little more of vegetable oil. Cooking, chopping, and pureeing can enhance uptake making a pasta sauce a great source of lycopene.
Good evidence
 
Good evidence
 
Some evidence
 
Evidence in animal or lab studies
 
Controversial evidence