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AgMag BLOG

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The Latest from AgMag

Thursday, April 7, 2016

The recent Porter Ranch methane spill in Los Angeles County spewed about 66 tons of methane into the air every hour for four months. After the leak was finally sealed in February, scientists estimated it had discharged a total of 106,000 tons of methane into the air, making it the worst such leak in U.S. history.

 

Thursday, April 7, 2016

Crop insurance hikes up the cost of cropland -- bad news for small farmers who own their own land and growers, large and small, who rent acreage from landlords.

 

Monday, March 28, 2016

Genetically modified corn and soybeans were supposed to reduce chemical use on farms, but instead they’ve done the exact opposite by creating herbicide-resistant "superweeds" and increasing the use of Monsanto’s toxic weed killer Roundup. Now the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's internal watchdog wants to know how this chemical war on weeds is affecting human health and the environment.

Friday, March 25, 2016

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said this week (March 23) it will allow farmers to plant a new strain of genetically modified (GMO) corn created by Monsanto to be tolerant of the week killers dicamba and glufosinate without government oversight, a step likely to expand the use of these chemical herbicides.

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

A new study (March 21) concludes that monarch butterflies may go extinct within two decades, largely as the result of widespread adoption of herbicides used with genetically modified corn and soybeans in the United States.

 

Monday, March 21, 2016

Candy giant Mars Inc., maker of the iconic brands M&Ms and Snickers, announced today that it will soon begin labeling products that contain genetically modified ingredients.

 

Key Issues: 
Thursday, March 17, 2016

In a major win for consumers, Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) yesterday failed to attract the votes he needed to end debate on a bill known to opponents as the Deny Americans the Right to Know Act, or DARK Act. It fell far short of the 60-vote threshold required to advance the bill.

 

Key Issues: 
Thursday, March 17, 2016

Production of corn ethanol has led growers to plow up of millions of acres of prairie grassland and wetlands to plant more corn. By the Environmental Protection Agency’s own definition, this means that corn ethanol is not a renewable fuel.

 

Key Issues: 
Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Over the last three election cycles, Big Food and Ag businesses and organizations have donated more than $2.5 million to members of the Senate Agriculture Committee and over $8.5 million to Senate candidates overall, a new analysis by EWG shows.

 

Key Issues: 
Tuesday, March 15, 2016

More meat and fish from genetically engineered animals could be coming to your dinner plate.

 

Key Issues: 
Tuesday, March 15, 2016

The new version of the DARK Act introduced by Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) would allow companies to voluntarily rely on toll-free numbers and websites instead of labels to inform American consumers whether their food was produced with genetic engineering.
 

Key Issues: 
Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Last night (March 14) Sen.Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) filed a new version of the bill we call the Deny Americans the Right to Know, or DARK, Act. Unfortunately, this new proposal is not much better than the previous versions we’ve seen.

 

Key Issues: 
Monday, March 14, 2016

Editorial boards across the country have been weighing in about the wrong-headed “Deny Americans the Right to Know,” or DARK, Act. Whether they favor GMO labeling or simply reject the notion of blocking the states’ right to pass their own labeling requirements, these editorial boards all see things the way we do: It’s vital to stop the DARK Act from passing in the Senate.

Key Issues: 
Thursday, March 10, 2016

In the debate over labeling foods that contain genetically modified ingredients, one of the most frequently repeated arguments against state GMO-labeling laws is this: that state laws will create a “patchwork quilt” of varying requirements that will force food producers to use different labels in different states. Everyone from food and farm lobbyists to legislators repeat the claim that varying state GMO-labeling laws will put huge new burdens on food companies and ultimately drive up the price of food.

 

Key Issues: 
Wednesday, March 9, 2016

In a recent interview for New York magazine’s Grub Street, author and food activist Michael Pollan laid out why he believes that food containing genetically modified ingredients (GMOs) should be labeled – and why GMO crops have been bad for the environment.
 

Key Issues: 
Monday, March 7, 2016

Federal crop insurance encourages growers to plant crops on land that is vulnerable to soil erosion and discourages landowners from adopting good conservation practices.

Wednesday, March 2, 2016

A new study by Purdue University claims that if all American farmers switch to growing non-GMO crops, food will cost more, crop yields will be lower and more land will be needed to grow our food.

 

Key Issues: 
Tuesday, March 1, 2016

The crop insurance industry must be getting desperate. The federal crop insurance program from which this industry profits handsomely is coming under increasing scrutiny. The industry’s claims to defend this bloated program are straying farther and farther from reality.

 

Key Issues: 
Friday, February 26, 2016

Will consumers use their smartphones to figure whether the food they’re buying contains genetically engineered ingredients, or GMOs?

 

Key Issues: 
Thursday, February 25, 2016

I love chefs. They make delicious meals, create food innovations to tantalize our taste buds and have (arguably) some of the best reality TV shows. And now they’ve come together to stand up for our right to know what’s in our food and how it’s made.

 

Key Issues: 

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