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AgMag BLOG

Feeding your mind, saving the planet >>

The Latest from AgMag

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

A team of scientists at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Army Institute of Research in Washington, D.C. has discovered the first instance of a person living in the U.S. infected with a feared antibiotic-resistant microbe, according to a research report published Thursday (May 26) in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.   

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Thinking about going to the beach this Memorial Day weekend? You might want to think again if you live in one of the many parts of the country where lakes and rivers are now too dangerous for swimming, largely because of farm pollution and the spread of toxic algae blooms.

 
Key Issues: 
Wednesday, May 25, 2016

After an expert panel convened by the National Academy of Sciences issued a long-awaited report on genetically engineered foods, much of the news coverage said it gave GMOs an unqualified seal of approval. In fact, the report pointed to an array of concerns and unanswered questions. Here are the top ten findings of the report that most traditional and social media missed – or got plain wrong.

Key Issues: 
Wednesday, May 25, 2016

The nutritional and environmental benefits of organic agriculture are two of the main reasons that shoppers seek out organic foods and other products. But did you know organic is also good for the local economy?

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

A news investigation last week reaffirmed that nitrate levels in the Des Moines River watershed exceed the Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking water limit, posing a threat to infants, pregnant women and others for whom excessive nitrate can be a health hazard.

 

Key Issues: 
Friday, May 20, 2016

Keeping water clean and safe enough to drink is a tough job, especially when there are forces that sabotage this vital public health goal.

 
Key Issues: 
Thursday, May 19, 2016

Large-scale industrial agriculture in the United States and much of the world releases more air pollution than all other emissions sources combined, much of it forming fine particles that are “a huge source of disease and death,” a team of scientists at Columbia University report in a startling new study.

Key Issues: 
Thursday, May 19, 2016

New data released today by the Organic Trade Association show that total organic product sales in the U.S. for 2015 hit a new record of $42.3 billion, up 11 percent from the previous year’s record level.

 

 

Key Issues: 
Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Without mandatory GMO labeling, consumers will not be able to reflect their values in their food choices. That’s one conclusion of an expert panel convened by the National Academy of Sciences to assess the genetic engineering of crops. The panel released its report this morning. 

Key Issues: 
Tuesday, May 17, 2016

The farm subsidy lobby has been proclaiming that growers are suffering through a “farm crisis” as a result of falling commodity prices. A new EWG analysis released today, however, shows that the large farm businesses that receive the most subsidies are not doing as poorly as the industry claims, especially compared to other American families.

 

Monday, May 16, 2016

We need a consistent approach to agricultural conservation.Driving around central Iowa on a crop survey this spring, EWG analysts came across a far-too-common scene: adjacent fields reflecting disparate responses to the problem of agricultural runoff. EWG’s report, “Fooling Ourselves,” showed that voluntary programs to encourage planting of protective vegetation along vulnerable waterways were not achieving lasting results.

 

Monday, May 16, 2016

As the deadline nears for companies to comply with Vermont’s GMO labeling,  Big Food and Big Ag lobbyists are making increasingly desperate claims about the impact of mandatory labeling of foods with genetically modified ingredients. Tomorrow, the National Academy of Sciences will release a report on GMO crops. We’re hoping it will bust some of the myths being circulated by labeling opponents such as Monsanto

Key Issues: 
Friday, May 13, 2016

The Obama administration is right to regulate methane from oil and gas wells. But there’s no good reason to exempt methane from agriculture – which is the second largest source of methane in the U.S. and the largest source globally.

 

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Do you support the federal government handing out unlimited crop insurance subsidies to millionaires and billionaires without disclosing who gets them?

 

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

When the Environmental Protection Agency recently released and then abruptly withdrew a draft document on the cancer risks posed by the pesticide glyphosate, Monsanto jumped at the chance to say that its signature chemical had been exonerated.

 

Key Issues: 
Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Dozens of independent studies show that pesticides do profound damage to children’s health, according to a report released this week (May 10) by the non-profit Pesticide Action Network.

 

Key Issues: 
Friday, May 6, 2016

This week, Grist offered its opinion about the biggest debates in food policy. But many of the biggest kitchen-table issues weren’t on the list, including climate change, farm pollution, food safety, animal welfare, and the fate of food and farm workers.

 

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Three decades ago, farmers reached a deal with taxpayers: farmers would reduce erosion on “highly erodible lands” and protect wetlands in exchange for generous government subsidies.

 

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

If true, it’s troubling news that cartoonist Rick Friday has been fired by the publication Farm News for an editorial cartoon suggesting that the chief executives of Monsanto, John Deere, DuPont and other multi-national agribusiness corporations are profiting at the expense of ordinary farmers.

 

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

As summer approaches, so do the toxic algal blooms that plague Lake Erie every year, killing fish and making the water too dangerous to swim in.

 

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