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AgMag BLOG

Feeding your mind, saving the planet >>

The Latest from AgMag

Monday, October 26, 2009

Crying Wolf, EWG's recent report on current climate change legislation, convincingly debunked exaggerated claims that a cap-and-trade system to limit greenhouse gases will increase costs for the agriculture sector. Many farm state lawmakers and agri-lobby groups have been recklessly misstating and inflating the cost of protecting agriculture from the ravages of climate change, using flawed conclusions drawn from their analysis of the Waxman-Markey climate bill (officially the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 or ACES).

Key Issues: 
Friday, October 23, 2009

Whoops.

study in the journal Science today got widespread news coverage by pointing out a major flaw in the way the world has been calculating the impact of biofuels use on the atmosphere’s greenhouse gas buildup and global warming.

Key Issues: 
Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Mississippi River and Gulf of Mexico watershed informational slides.

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Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD) introduced legislation today aimed at reducing pollution that has endangered the Chesapeake Bay watershed for over 25 years. The Chesapeake Clean Water and Ecosystem Restoration Act will give state and federal governments more power and funding to clean up pollution from agriculture sources and metropolitan storm run-off.

Key Issues: 
Tuesday, October 20, 2009

“Frito-Lay traveling nachos with cornbread, served with a corn cobbette” – that’s what’s for lunch today in my old elementary school cafeteria in Richmond, VA.

Thursday, October 15, 2009

When we talk about California and climate change, agriculture matters.  California's agriculture sector faces two major challenges:

  1. Reduce its contribution to climate change.
  2. Arm itself against the threats a warming planet poses to agricultural production.
Key Issues: 
Tuesday, October 6, 2009

Farm industry leaders and their supporters in Congress are trying to derail climate change legislation by insisting that the House-passed bill, the American Clean Energy and Security Act (ACES), will cause ruinous increases in the costs of production for farmers. They claim this threat is so potentially devastating that climate change legislation should be shelved or loaded up with concessions that send more money to their agricultural constituents.

Key Issues: 
Thursday, September 24, 2009

Remarks by Environmental Working Group Midwest Vice-President Craig Cox to the Mississippi River Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force Public Meeting.

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Thursday, September 24, 2009

 

Associated Press, John Heilprin

Published December 20, 2005

Drinking water may have a lot more in it than just H20 and fluoride, according to an environmental group's analysis of records in 42 states.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Fresno Bee, Mark Grossi

Published March 17, 2005

The federal government is promising 43% more water for California farmers in new irrigation contracts, meaning new dams would have to be built in the next two decades, a new environmental report warns.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009


Published June 11, 2007

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Monday, September 21, 2009

 

US Fed News

Published May 24, 2005

The office of Sen. Russell Feingold, D-Wis., issued the following press release: Sen. Russ Feingold has introduced legislation that could help save $2.5 billion over the next five years.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Dan Rather Reports

Aired on November 20, 2007

Episode Title: Pay Dirt: Subsidies and the American Farmer

Description: Some farmers are worried that huge subsides are a waste. A visit to the backwaters of Burma and taming Louisiana's wetlands

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Sacramento Bee, Jim Wasserman

Published August 1, 2005

A national environmental group critical of farm subsidies said Tuesday that more than 1,200 Central Valley farms received federally subsidized water to grow subsidized crops in 2002.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Roll Call, Anna Palmer

Published July 7, 2008

Dressed in a dark pinstripe suit with a blue striped shirt and tie, John Boyd Jr. looks the part of Washington insider.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

Fresno Bee, Dennis Pollock and Robert Rodriguez

Published August 2, 2005

Many farms in California's Central Valley Water Project are "double dipping" in taxpayer pockets by using subsidized water to grow subsidized crops, a watchdog group charged Tuesday.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Minneapolis Star Tribune

Published September 18, 2006

The idea that agriculture has become a major source of pollution in the Mississippi River will startle many Midwesterners. But it's no surprise to the government's top environmental regulators.

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Monday, September 21, 2009

Associated Press, Terence Chea

Published August 2, 2005

Some of California's largest farms receive millions of dollars in federal subsidies by "double dipping" - using government-subsidized water to grow subsidized crops such as rice and cotton, according to a watchdog group's analysis.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

New Standard, Jessica Azulay

Published April 11, 2006

Every summer, a huge swell of algae spreads through the Gulf of Mexico and then dies, smothering aquatic life in its wake. Scientists have documented this expanding "dead zone" since the early 1970s, finding that in recent years it has grown to an average of 14,000 square miles of ocean.

Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Agriculture Online

Published August 2, 2005

The Environmental Working Group today released the results of a computer study that looked at federal crop and water subsidies to California's Central Valley Project. The group says some of America's richest agribusinesses are "double dipping" from US taxpayers' pockets at a rate of hundreds of millions of dollars a year.

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