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AgMag BLOG

Feeding your mind, saving the planet >>

The Latest from AgMag

Wednesday, October 28, 2009

Last week saw the launch of a new web property by a coalition of environmental and business groups who take a dim view of plans to raise the ethanol content of gasoline to 15%. The site, Follow the Science, marshals the overwhelming scientific evidence to deliver a focused message to the Obama Administration and Congress to not raise the corn ethanol blend limit by 50%.

Key Issues: 
Monday, October 26, 2009

Crying Wolf, EWG's recent report on current climate change legislation, convincingly debunked exaggerated claims that a cap-and-trade system to limit greenhouse gases will increase costs for the agriculture sector. Many farm state lawmakers and agri-lobby groups have been recklessly misstating and inflating the cost of protecting agriculture from the ravages of climate change, using flawed conclusions drawn from their analysis of the Waxman-Markey climate bill (officially the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 or ACES).

Key Issues: 
Friday, October 23, 2009

Whoops.

study in the journal Science today got widespread news coverage by pointing out a major flaw in the way the world has been calculating the impact of biofuels use on the atmosphere’s greenhouse gas buildup and global warming.

Key Issues: 
Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Mississippi River and Gulf of Mexico watershed informational slides.

Key Issues: 
Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD) introduced legislation today aimed at reducing pollution that has endangered the Chesapeake Bay watershed for over 25 years. The Chesapeake Clean Water and Ecosystem Restoration Act will give state and federal governments more power and funding to clean up pollution from agriculture sources and metropolitan storm run-off.

Key Issues: 
Tuesday, October 20, 2009

“Frito-Lay traveling nachos with cornbread, served with a corn cobbette” – that’s what’s for lunch today in my old elementary school cafeteria in Richmond, VA.

Thursday, October 15, 2009

When we talk about California and climate change, agriculture matters.  California's agriculture sector faces two major challenges:

  1. Reduce its contribution to climate change.
  2. Arm itself against the threats a warming planet poses to agricultural production.
Key Issues: 
Tuesday, October 6, 2009

Farm industry leaders and their supporters in Congress are trying to derail climate change legislation by insisting that the House-passed bill, the American Clean Energy and Security Act (ACES), will cause ruinous increases in the costs of production for farmers. They claim this threat is so potentially devastating that climate change legislation should be shelved or loaded up with concessions that send more money to their agricultural constituents.

Key Issues: 
Thursday, September 24, 2009

Remarks by Environmental Working Group Midwest Vice-President Craig Cox to the Mississippi River Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force Public Meeting.

Key Issues: 
Thursday, September 24, 2009

 

Associated Press, John Heilprin

Published December 20, 2005

Drinking water may have a lot more in it than just H20 and fluoride, according to an environmental group's analysis of records in 42 states.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Women’s Health Weekly
Published January 31, 2002

Millions of Americans have been drinking tap water contaminated with chemical chlorine byproducts that are far more than what studies suggest may be safe for pregnant women, two environmental groups say in a new study.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Des Moines Register

Published July 14, 2007

Work on the 2007 farm bill comes at an exciting time for agriculture in America. Adding energy crops as a third major source of income, along with food and fiber, has the potential to profoundly change the economics of agriculture, boost incomes and revitalize the countryside.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Aberdeen American, Larry Gabriel

Published August 24, 2006

If you have not heard of it, you will. The mass media is blaming "agriculture" for a predicted increase in the size of the so-called "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

The Washington Post, Anita Huslin

Published February 10, 2002

Annette Spaven already had three children when she found out she was pregnant again four years ago.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Omaha World Herald, Bill Hord

Published June 12, 2007

Florida land tycoon Maurice Wilder, who owns 33,000 acres of farm ground in southwest Nebraska and 200,000 acres nationwide, topped the nation's list of farm subsidy recipients in 2005.

Wilder received $1.8 million in subsidies that year, according to a new national database posted Monday by the Environmental Working Group.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Bill Lambrecht
Published June 14, 2007

There was hope for a cure down in the Louisiana bayous even as the Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone expanded like a B-movie blob.

Monday, September 21, 2009

MSNBC Published January 8, 2002 Millions of Americans have been drinking tap water contaminated with potentially harmful byproducts of chlorine - and often at levels in excess of what studies show to be safe for pregnant women, two environmental groups say in a new report. Chlorine is commonly used to disinfect drinking water. When it is added to water that contains organic matter such as runoff from farms or lawns, however, it can form compounds such as chloroform that can cause illness.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

The New York Times, Timothy Egan

Published June 27, 2007

Drive across the empty reaches of the Great Plains, from the lost promise of Valentine, Neb., to the shadowless side roads into Sunray, Tex., and what you see is a land that has lost its purpose. Many of the towns set in this infinity of flat have a listless look, with shuttered main streets and schools given over to the grave.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Reuters

Published September 10, 2007

U.S. farmers should be required to control soil erosion and fertilizer runoff from all land eligible for crop subsidies -- which would be a major expansion of "conservation compliance" rules now in place, an environmental group said on Monday.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Fresno Bee, Mark Grossi

Published March 17, 2005

The federal government is promising 43% more water for California farmers in new irrigation contracts, meaning new dams would have to be built in the next two decades, a new environmental report warns.

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