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Friday, September 18, 2009

Devastating floods and bad weather in the Midwest are raising the tide of opposition against the renewable fuels standard. Groups that have been pressing lawmakers to reconsider federal supports for ethanol are now pointing to flooded fields in the nation’s cornbelt as further evidence the United States may struggle to meet the standard.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Des Moines Register, Craig Cox

Published November 3, 2008

Two recent reports in the Register make it clear that we need to overhaul our biofuels policy.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

Corn grower Tim Recker says Barack Obama’s relatively strong showing in rural Iowa should provide a warning to both parties: Attack ethanol subsidies at your peril.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Bakersfield Californian, Bill Walker

Published October 29, 2005

In his recent Community Voices column, the president of Westlands Water District blasted Environmental Working Group's investigation of the district's proposed federal water subsidies contract.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Des Moines Register , PHILIP BRASHER

Published May 29, 2009

Washington, D.C. - Government conservation money in Iowa should be targeted to farms in areas that pollute the Mississippi River basin and cause a dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico, an environmental group says.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

The 2008 Farm Bill has barely left the lot and Congress has pulled it back into the garage for some tinkering. The U.S. Senate has proposed $331 million in cuts to a series of conservation programs designed to leave some land in its natural state rather than plowing every square inch under for crops. Last week, the Environmental Working Group — those folks who publish how much every farmer gets in Farm Bill subsidies — held a conference call to protest.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

With first compliance deadline in WTO cotton decision looming, Brazil explores a novel trade retaliation: suspension of intellectual property rights for U.S. products.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

On behalf of our millions of members and activists, we strongly urge you to oppose the Emerson Amendment (#019) and any other attempts to sidestep the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) process to assess the full lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels (including emissions from indirect land-use change).

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

September 2006

Pressure is building in Congress for pre-election enactment of the most expensive emergency agricultural disaster aid bill in history.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Daily Republic, Seth Tupper

Published September 24, 2008

South Dakota stands to lose $5.268 million of federal funding that was pledged by the farm bill toward a popular conservation program, according to new estimates from an environmental watchdog group.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Gannett News Service (Detroit Free Press), Doug Abrahms

Published June 4, 2008

Robert Harrold missed the 2000 deadline for filing a benefit discrimination claim against the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Federal regulators are negotiating an agricultural water contract in the Central Valley, the latest of several dozen deals that could tie up water resources for the next 50 years. Thursday is the public's last day to comment on the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's proposal to renew its long-term contract with Westlands Water District, which provides water to some 800 farms in Fresno and Kings counties.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

Statement of Ken Cook, President, Environmental Working Group House Agriculture Chairman Collin Peterson, Ranking Member Bob Goodlatte, members of their committee, and their staffs, are to be commended for working long and hard to produce the Farm Bill passed by the House of Representatives today.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

After 50 years of legal infighting, a victor has emerged in California's water wars -- agriculture. A decade after environmentalists prevailed in getting more fresh water down the north state's rivers and estuaries to improve fisheries and wildlife habitat, farmers are again triumphant. Central Valley irrigation districts are signing federal contracts that assure their farms ample water for the next 25 to 50 years.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Farm state senators, confronting an increasing struggle to win special disaster assistance for farmers, today will push for creation of a permanent disaster aid trust fund. The Senate Finance Committee will debate a new $6.1 billion trust fund that's been proposed by its chairman, Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

He was immortalized in Grant Wood's 1930 painting "American Gothic": a grim, hardscrabble stoic in overalls, grasping a pitchfork. Guess what? It wasn't really a farmer. It was Wood's dentist posing as a farmer.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

Washington, D.C. - Some growers could get payments just to keep farming the way they already are, under changes being made to a House climate bill. Farm groups won provisions in the legislation that are intended to make it easier for farmers to qualify for a new carbon offset program that would be established by the bill.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

Environmental Working Group is a research and advocacy nonprofit with considerable expertise in U.S. agriculture. We are perhaps best known in agriculture policy circles for our Farm Subsidy Database, which lists all the nation’s farm subsidy recipients and their share of the $165 billion taxpayers have spent on the programs since 1995.

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Thursday, September 17, 2009

Dow Jones, Bill Tomson

Published January 9, 2009

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Thursday, September 17, 2009

 

A California environmental agency this week will consider a controversial new way to evaluate the carbon footprint of biofuels. At stake for the ethanol industry is continued unencumbered access to the state that uses the most motor fuel in the country, and the prospect that other states could follow California’s lead.

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