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AgMag BLOG

Feeding your mind, saving the planet >>

The Latest from AgMag

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Mississippi River and Gulf of Mexico watershed informational slides.

Key Issues: 
Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD) introduced legislation today aimed at reducing pollution that has endangered the Chesapeake Bay watershed for over 25 years. The Chesapeake Clean Water and Ecosystem Restoration Act will give state and federal governments more power and funding to clean up pollution from agriculture sources and metropolitan storm run-off.

Key Issues: 
Tuesday, October 20, 2009

“Frito-Lay traveling nachos with cornbread, served with a corn cobbette” – that’s what’s for lunch today in my old elementary school cafeteria in Richmond, VA.

Thursday, October 15, 2009

When we talk about California and climate change, agriculture matters.  California's agriculture sector faces two major challenges:

  1. Reduce its contribution to climate change.
  2. Arm itself against the threats a warming planet poses to agricultural production.
Key Issues: 
Tuesday, October 6, 2009

Farm industry leaders and their supporters in Congress are trying to derail climate change legislation by insisting that the House-passed bill, the American Clean Energy and Security Act (ACES), will cause ruinous increases in the costs of production for farmers. They claim this threat is so potentially devastating that climate change legislation should be shelved or loaded up with concessions that send more money to their agricultural constituents.

Key Issues: 
Thursday, September 24, 2009

 

Associated Press, John Heilprin

Published December 20, 2005

Drinking water may have a lot more in it than just H20 and fluoride, according to an environmental group's analysis of records in 42 states.

Key Issues: 
Thursday, September 24, 2009

Remarks by Environmental Working Group Midwest Vice-President Craig Cox to the Mississippi River Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force Public Meeting.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

Farm Futures, Jacqui Fatka

Published April 9, 2006

Nitrate pollution in the Mississippi River Basin is a growing problem, creating a Dead Zone downstream for marine wildlife. A new analysis from the Environmental Working Group shows that the problem is more solvable than it ever has looked before if the federal government begins to focus conservation needs in the trouble area.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

San Francisco Chronicle, Bill Walker

Published August 18, 2005

Let's say you own a factory that makes titanium widgets. You make more widgets than people need, so the government buys your surplus at a guaranteed profit. That's generous.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Nancy Cole

Published April 10, 2006

Farmers in 15 northeast Arkansas counties are among the top contributors of fertilizer pollution that creates a "dead zone" of more than 5, 000 square miles in the Gulf of Mexico, according to a study released Monday by the Environmental Working Group.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Associated Press, John Heilprin

Published January 8, 2002

Millions of Americans have been drinking tap water contaminated with chemical byproducts from chlorine that are far more than what studies suggest may be safe for pregnant women, two environmental groups say in a new study.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Associated Press (+ 60 outlets), Garance Burke

Published May 29, 2007

Some of the nation's largest farming operations are paying rock-bottom rates for the electricity they use to pump federally subsidized water to their fields.

Monday, September 21, 2009

New Orleans Times-Picayune, Matthew Brown

Published April 16, 2006

Louisiana's fishing industry faces an uncertain future after the pounding it took last hurricane season, but fishers know one thing is certain: Sometime this summer, a lifeless expanse of water about the size of Connecticut -- maybe a little bigger, maybe a little smaller -- will form off the state's coast.

Monday, September 21, 2009

USA Today, Michelle Healy
Published January 9, 2002

Millions of Americans have been drinking tap water contaminated with chemical byproducts from chlorine that are far more than what studies suggest may be safe for pregnant women, two environmental groups say in a study. Chlorine is commonly used to disinfect drinking water. When it is added to water that contains organic matter such as runoff from farms or lawns, however, it can form compounds such as chloroform that can cause illness.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Central Valley Business Times

Published May 29, 2007

Some Central Valley farms are paying pennies for the electricity needed to deliver irrigation water, claims a report Wednesday from the Environmental Working Group, which describes itself as “a non-profit, non-partisan organization” that gets the majority of its funding from private charitable foundations.

Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Delta Farm Press, David Bennett

Published May 4, 2006

In what could be the first significant shot fired in the 2007 farm bill debate, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has released a report on how Mississippi River Basin (MRB) fertilizer run-off is contributing to a massive oxygen-depleted hypoxia zone in the Gulf of Mexico.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Los Angeles Daily News, Lisa Mascaro

Published January 9, 2002

Drinking tap water could put pregnant women at higher risk for miscarriage and birth defects in some parts of Southern California, says a report released Tuesday by two environmental groups.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Capital Press, Bob Krauter

Published May 29, 2007

Central Valley farmers are amped up by a study that says they are getting cut-rate electricity from the federal government.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Reuters

Published May 4, 2006

More than half of US streams are polluted, with the worst conditions found in the eastern third of the country, according to a study by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

Chicago Sun-Times, Gary Wisby
Published January 9, 2002

Chlorination of tap water puts thousands of Illinois women at risk of miscarriage or birth defects, according to a report released by environmental activists Tuesday.

Key Issues: 

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