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Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Sacramento Bee, Jim Wasserman

Published August 1, 2005

A national environmental group critical of farm subsidies said Tuesday that more than 1,200 Central Valley farms received federally subsidized water to grow subsidized crops in 2002.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Roll Call, Anna Palmer

Published July 7, 2008

Dressed in a dark pinstripe suit with a blue striped shirt and tie, John Boyd Jr. looks the part of Washington insider.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

Fresno Bee, Dennis Pollock and Robert Rodriguez

Published August 2, 2005

Many farms in California's Central Valley Water Project are "double dipping" in taxpayer pockets by using subsidized water to grow subsidized crops, a watchdog group charged Tuesday.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Minneapolis Star Tribune

Published September 18, 2006

The idea that agriculture has become a major source of pollution in the Mississippi River will startle many Midwesterners. But it's no surprise to the government's top environmental regulators.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

Associated Press, Terence Chea

Published August 2, 2005

Some of California's largest farms receive millions of dollars in federal subsidies by "double dipping" - using government-subsidized water to grow subsidized crops such as rice and cotton, according to a watchdog group's analysis.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

New Standard, Jessica Azulay

Published April 11, 2006

Every summer, a huge swell of algae spreads through the Gulf of Mexico and then dies, smothering aquatic life in its wake. Scientists have documented this expanding "dead zone" since the early 1970s, finding that in recent years it has grown to an average of 14,000 square miles of ocean.

Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Agriculture Online

Published August 2, 2005

The Environmental Working Group today released the results of a computer study that looked at federal crop and water subsidies to California's Central Valley Project. The group says some of America's richest agribusinesses are "double dipping" from US taxpayers' pockets at a rate of hundreds of millions of dollars a year.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Chicago Tribune, Andrew Martin

Published April 9, 2006

A new study on Monday found that a relatively small percentage of rural counties – many of them in Illinois – are contributing most of the fertilizer pollution that is creating a summertime “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico, where massive algae blooms snuff out most aquatic life.

 

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

San Francisco Chronicle, Bill Walker

Published August 18, 2005

Let's say you own a factory that makes titanium widgets. You make more widgets than people need, so the government buys your surplus at a guaranteed profit. That's generous.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

Farm Futures, Jacqui Fatka

Published April 9, 2006

Nitrate pollution in the Mississippi River Basin is a growing problem, creating a Dead Zone downstream for marine wildlife. A new analysis from the Environmental Working Group shows that the problem is more solvable than it ever has looked before if the federal government begins to focus conservation needs in the trouble area.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Associated Press, John Heilprin

Published January 8, 2002

Millions of Americans have been drinking tap water contaminated with chemical byproducts from chlorine that are far more than what studies suggest may be safe for pregnant women, two environmental groups say in a new study.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Associated Press (+ 60 outlets), Garance Burke

Published May 29, 2007

Some of the nation's largest farming operations are paying rock-bottom rates for the electricity they use to pump federally subsidized water to their fields.

Monday, September 21, 2009

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Nancy Cole

Published April 10, 2006

Farmers in 15 northeast Arkansas counties are among the top contributors of fertilizer pollution that creates a "dead zone" of more than 5, 000 square miles in the Gulf of Mexico, according to a study released Monday by the Environmental Working Group.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

USA Today, Michelle Healy
Published January 9, 2002

Millions of Americans have been drinking tap water contaminated with chemical byproducts from chlorine that are far more than what studies suggest may be safe for pregnant women, two environmental groups say in a study. Chlorine is commonly used to disinfect drinking water. When it is added to water that contains organic matter such as runoff from farms or lawns, however, it can form compounds such as chloroform that can cause illness.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Central Valley Business Times

Published May 29, 2007

Some Central Valley farms are paying pennies for the electricity needed to deliver irrigation water, claims a report Wednesday from the Environmental Working Group, which describes itself as “a non-profit, non-partisan organization” that gets the majority of its funding from private charitable foundations.

Monday, September 21, 2009

New Orleans Times-Picayune, Matthew Brown

Published April 16, 2006

Louisiana's fishing industry faces an uncertain future after the pounding it took last hurricane season, but fishers know one thing is certain: Sometime this summer, a lifeless expanse of water about the size of Connecticut -- maybe a little bigger, maybe a little smaller -- will form off the state's coast.

Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Los Angeles Daily News, Lisa Mascaro

Published January 9, 2002

Drinking tap water could put pregnant women at higher risk for miscarriage and birth defects in some parts of Southern California, says a report released Tuesday by two environmental groups.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Capital Press, Bob Krauter

Published May 29, 2007

Central Valley farmers are amped up by a study that says they are getting cut-rate electricity from the federal government.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Delta Farm Press, David Bennett

Published May 4, 2006

In what could be the first significant shot fired in the 2007 farm bill debate, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has released a report on how Mississippi River Basin (MRB) fertilizer run-off is contributing to a massive oxygen-depleted hypoxia zone in the Gulf of Mexico.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

Chicago Sun-Times, Gary Wisby
Published January 9, 2002

Chlorination of tap water puts thousands of Illinois women at risk of miscarriage or birth defects, according to a report released by environmental activists Tuesday.

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