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AgMag BLOG

Feeding your mind, saving the planet >>

The Latest from AgMag

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Dow AgroSciences, which is seeking federal approval to sell a new herbicide mixture, last week (July 3) attacked an EWG analysis pointing out that thousands of school children could be exposed to toxic chemicals if the product goes on the market.

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014

School children in districts represented by some members of the House subcommittee that oversees biotechnology could soon be at increased risk of being exposed to a toxic weed killer, a recent EWG analysis shows.

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Tuesday, July 8, 2014

The 32 countries competing in the 2014 FIFA World Cup ™ are all required to play by the same rules on the soccer field, but off the field they subscribe to different sets of rules when it comes to labeling genetically engineered foods.

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014

There are 5,532 American schools within 200 feet of farm fields that may soon be blanketed with massive amounts of a toxic defoliant linked to Parkinson’s disease, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and reproductive and immune system problems.

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

If every American simply switched from beef to chicken, we could reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 137 million metric tons of carbon  — or as much as taking 26 million cars off the road. 

That’s because beef produces eight times as much greenhouse gases as chicken (and 20 times as much as vegetable proteins like beans).

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Thursday, June 26, 2014

When U.S. Department of Agriculture’s annual spending bill comes up for action again in the House and Senate next month, Congress may finally get a chance to rein in unlimited, secret subsidies to some of the nation’s largest farm businesses.

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Wednesday, June 18, 2014

The School Nutrition Association, which has allied itself with big food companies in an effort to weaken a four-year old federal law requiring healthier school lunches, has suffered the latest in series of embarrassing defections by prominent members and former leaders.

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Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Corn is in the food we eat, the soda we drink, the gas we buy, plastics, cleaners – it’s everywhere.

Producing all that corn is a $1.7 trillion industry in the United States, and as a new report documents, it’s one that takes a tremendous toll on the environment and is under threat from water shortages and climate change. But federal policies continue to encourage corn growers and corn-based industries to stay on an unsustainable course.  

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

More than 200 national, state and local organizations and dozens of health professionals signed onto a letter declaring their support for an amendment proposed by Rep. Sam Farr (D-Calif.) to protect federal school nutrition standards. Farr’s proposal aims to fend off efforts to weaken those standards when Congress votes on the upcoming agriculture appropriations bill.  

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Monday, June 16, 2014

In the ongoing campaign to get Congress to weaken federal requirements for healthier school lunches and snacks, the School Nutrition Association is trying to create the impression that it speaks for the nation’s “lunch ladies,” the hundreds of thousands of women and men who prepare and serve food to children in schools.

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Monday, June 16, 2014

EWG’s recent report, “Ethanol’s Broken Promise,” came under attack last week (June 12) by researchers at the Argonne National Laboratory who challenged our conclusion that reducing the amount of corn ethanol blended into gasoline will reduce the carbon emissions that intensify global warming.

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Wednesday, June 11, 2014

When people think about the causes of global warming, the food they eat typically doesn’t make the short list. But agriculture is responsible for 80 percent of human-caused emissions of nitrous oxide, which is a greenhouse gas 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide.

And now a new study by researchers at Michigan State University shows that using more fertilizers than crops need is even more harmful to the climate than previous estimates indicated.

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

School lunch ladies and frozen pizza and french fry companies have more in common than the food they serve: they have also been represented by the same lobbyists.

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Tuesday, June 10, 2014

The Renewable Fuels Association, a well-funded lobbyist group for Big Ethanol, recently responded to EWG’s report, Ethanol’s Broken Promise, by claiming that corn ethanol isn’t worse for the climate than gasoline.  

RFA hasn't done its homework. Recent peer-reviewed research shows that the model RFA uses to mount its defense drastically under-estimates carbon emissions.

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Thursday, June 5, 2014

We already knew that corn ethanol produces more greenhouse gas emissions than gasoline.

Now the Obama Administration says corn ethanol is thirstier than gasoline.

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Wednesday, June 4, 2014

The Environmental Protection Agency appears poised to approve Dow Chemical’s bid to market a new toxic weed killer based on an agency analysis that failed to consider its danger to children’s health, as federal law requires.

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

The Obama Administration is right to demand cuts to greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. But those reductions won’t be a reality until 2030. If the Administration wants to cut emissions right now, the Environmental Protection Agency should move ahead with its plan to reduce the amount of corn ethanol blended into gasoline.

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Thursday, May 29, 2014

Taking 580,000 cars and trucks off the road would reduce a lot of greenhouse gas emissions.  And something like that would happen if a proposal by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency becomes reality.

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Friday, May 23, 2014

Scientists at the International Agency for Research on Cancer have found what appears to be a strong link between pesticide exposure and a blood cancer called non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Will Coggin, a senior research analyst at the Center for Consumer Freedom, wrote in The Hill last week that “Vermont became the first state to mandate de facto warning labels on genetically improved foods (GIFs), also referred to as GMOs.”

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