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Monday, September 21, 2009

 

The Washington Post, Anita Huslin

Published February 10, 2002

Annette Spaven already had three children when she found out she was pregnant again four years ago.

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Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Omaha World Herald, Bill Hord

Published June 12, 2007

Florida land tycoon Maurice Wilder, who owns 33,000 acres of farm ground in southwest Nebraska and 200,000 acres nationwide, topped the nation's list of farm subsidy recipients in 2005.

Wilder received $1.8 million in subsidies that year, according to a new national database posted Monday by the Environmental Working Group.

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Monday, September 21, 2009

St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Bill Lambrecht
Published June 14, 2007

There was hope for a cure down in the Louisiana bayous even as the Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone expanded like a B-movie blob.

Monday, September 21, 2009

MSNBC Published January 8, 2002 Millions of Americans have been drinking tap water contaminated with potentially harmful byproducts of chlorine - and often at levels in excess of what studies show to be safe for pregnant women, two environmental groups say in a new report. Chlorine is commonly used to disinfect drinking water. When it is added to water that contains organic matter such as runoff from farms or lawns, however, it can form compounds such as chloroform that can cause illness.

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Monday, September 21, 2009

The New York Times, Timothy Egan

Published June 27, 2007

Drive across the empty reaches of the Great Plains, from the lost promise of Valentine, Neb., to the shadowless side roads into Sunray, Tex., and what you see is a land that has lost its purpose. Many of the towns set in this infinity of flat have a listless look, with shuttered main streets and schools given over to the grave.

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Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Reuters

Published September 10, 2007

U.S. farmers should be required to control soil erosion and fertilizer runoff from all land eligible for crop subsidies -- which would be a major expansion of "conservation compliance" rules now in place, an environmental group said on Monday.

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Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Fresno Bee, Mark Grossi

Published March 17, 2005

The federal government is promising 43% more water for California farmers in new irrigation contracts, meaning new dams would have to be built in the next two decades, a new environmental report warns.

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Monday, September 21, 2009


Published June 11, 2007

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Monday, September 21, 2009

 

US Fed News

Published May 24, 2005

The office of Sen. Russell Feingold, D-Wis., issued the following press release: Sen. Russ Feingold has introduced legislation that could help save $2.5 billion over the next five years.

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Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Dan Rather Reports

Aired on November 20, 2007

Episode Title: Pay Dirt: Subsidies and the American Farmer

Description: Some farmers are worried that huge subsides are a waste. A visit to the backwaters of Burma and taming Louisiana's wetlands

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Sunday, September 20, 2009

Finding ways to reduce fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions while producing enough energy to support economic development worldwide is this century’s preeminent challenge. We must meet this challenge while simultaneously reducing environmental degradation, poverty and hunger. The United States must make a sustained commitment to invest in and develop renewable energy sources that contribute to meeting these challenges.

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Friday, September 18, 2009


Published November 16, 2007

Friday, September 18, 2009

With first compliance deadline in WTO cotton decision looming, Brazil explores a novel trade retaliation: suspension of intellectual property rights for U.S. products.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

On behalf of our millions of members and activists, we strongly urge you to oppose the Emerson Amendment (#019) and any other attempts to sidestep the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) process to assess the full lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels (including emissions from indirect land-use change).

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

September 2006

Pressure is building in Congress for pre-election enactment of the most expensive emergency agricultural disaster aid bill in history.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Daily Republic, Seth Tupper

Published September 24, 2008

South Dakota stands to lose $5.268 million of federal funding that was pledged by the farm bill toward a popular conservation program, according to new estimates from an environmental watchdog group.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Gannett News Service (Detroit Free Press), Doug Abrahms

Published June 4, 2008

Robert Harrold missed the 2000 deadline for filing a benefit discrimination claim against the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Federal regulators are negotiating an agricultural water contract in the Central Valley, the latest of several dozen deals that could tie up water resources for the next 50 years. Thursday is the public's last day to comment on the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's proposal to renew its long-term contract with Westlands Water District, which provides water to some 800 farms in Fresno and Kings counties.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

Statement of Ken Cook, President, Environmental Working Group House Agriculture Chairman Collin Peterson, Ranking Member Bob Goodlatte, members of their committee, and their staffs, are to be commended for working long and hard to produce the Farm Bill passed by the House of Representatives today.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

After 50 years of legal infighting, a victor has emerged in California's water wars -- agriculture. A decade after environmentalists prevailed in getting more fresh water down the north state's rivers and estuaries to improve fisheries and wildlife habitat, farmers are again triumphant. Central Valley irrigation districts are signing federal contracts that assure their farms ample water for the next 25 to 50 years.

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