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The Latest from AgMag

Monday, September 21, 2009

 

The Fresno Bee, Mark Grossi

Published May 29, 2007

Farmers in the Westlands Water District are underpaying to the tune of $71 million annually on cheap electricity for federal water deliveries, says an environmental watchdog group.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Reuters

Published May 4, 2006

More than half of US streams are polluted, with the worst conditions found in the eastern third of the country, according to a study by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Reuters
Published January 9, 2002

High levels of chlorination byproducts (CPBs) in drinking water put pregnant women at a higher risk for miscarriages or having children with birth defects, according to a study released on Tuesday.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Pioneer Press

Published June 11, 2007

Downtown Minneapolis is a little low on farmland. But it turns out to be full of farmers.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Minnesota Pilot-Independent, Babe Winkelman

Published June 19, 2006

What grows larger with each passing summer and is roughly the size of New Jersey? The answer: the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico, one of the world's most dynamic fisheries.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

San Francisco Chronicle, Jane Kay

Published January 9, 2002

Pregnant women who drink chlorinated tap water face a higher risk of miscarriage and birth defects in their newborns despite tougher new standards, says a study by two environmental groups.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

Minneapolis Star Tribune, Kevin Diaz

Published July 27, 2007

Do millionaire farmers need a safety net?

The question looms tall as a prairie silo over a multitude of controversies fueling congressional debate over the nation's next big farm bill.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Peoria Journal Star, Steve Tarter

Published June 25, 2006

It's an area the size of Connecticut that fails to harbor aquatic life in the Gulf of Mexico.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Women’s Health Weekly
Published January 31, 2002

Millions of Americans have been drinking tap water contaminated with chemical chlorine byproducts that are far more than what studies suggest may be safe for pregnant women, two environmental groups say in a new study.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Des Moines Register

Published July 14, 2007

Work on the 2007 farm bill comes at an exciting time for agriculture in America. Adding energy crops as a third major source of income, along with food and fiber, has the potential to profoundly change the economics of agriculture, boost incomes and revitalize the countryside.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Aberdeen American, Larry Gabriel

Published August 24, 2006

If you have not heard of it, you will. The mass media is blaming "agriculture" for a predicted increase in the size of the so-called "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

The Washington Post, Anita Huslin

Published February 10, 2002

Annette Spaven already had three children when she found out she was pregnant again four years ago.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Omaha World Herald, Bill Hord

Published June 12, 2007

Florida land tycoon Maurice Wilder, who owns 33,000 acres of farm ground in southwest Nebraska and 200,000 acres nationwide, topped the nation's list of farm subsidy recipients in 2005.

Wilder received $1.8 million in subsidies that year, according to a new national database posted Monday by the Environmental Working Group.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Bill Lambrecht
Published June 14, 2007

There was hope for a cure down in the Louisiana bayous even as the Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone expanded like a B-movie blob.

Monday, September 21, 2009

MSNBC Published January 8, 2002 Millions of Americans have been drinking tap water contaminated with potentially harmful byproducts of chlorine - and often at levels in excess of what studies show to be safe for pregnant women, two environmental groups say in a new report. Chlorine is commonly used to disinfect drinking water. When it is added to water that contains organic matter such as runoff from farms or lawns, however, it can form compounds such as chloroform that can cause illness.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

The New York Times, Timothy Egan

Published June 27, 2007

Drive across the empty reaches of the Great Plains, from the lost promise of Valentine, Neb., to the shadowless side roads into Sunray, Tex., and what you see is a land that has lost its purpose. Many of the towns set in this infinity of flat have a listless look, with shuttered main streets and schools given over to the grave.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Reuters

Published September 10, 2007

U.S. farmers should be required to control soil erosion and fertilizer runoff from all land eligible for crop subsidies -- which would be a major expansion of "conservation compliance" rules now in place, an environmental group said on Monday.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Fresno Bee, Mark Grossi

Published March 17, 2005

The federal government is promising 43% more water for California farmers in new irrigation contracts, meaning new dams would have to be built in the next two decades, a new environmental report warns.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009


Published June 11, 2007

Key Issues: 
Sunday, September 20, 2009

Finding ways to reduce fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions while producing enough energy to support economic development worldwide is this century’s preeminent challenge. We must meet this challenge while simultaneously reducing environmental degradation, poverty and hunger. The United States must make a sustained commitment to invest in and develop renewable energy sources that contribute to meeting these challenges.

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