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AgMag BLOG

Feeding your mind, saving the planet >>

The Latest from AgMag

Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Los Angeles Daily News, Lisa Mascaro

Published January 9, 2002

Drinking tap water could put pregnant women at higher risk for miscarriage and birth defects in some parts of Southern California, says a report released Tuesday by two environmental groups.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Capital Press, Bob Krauter

Published May 29, 2007

Central Valley farmers are amped up by a study that says they are getting cut-rate electricity from the federal government.

Key Issues: 
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Delta Farm Press, David Bennett

Published May 4, 2006

In what could be the first significant shot fired in the 2007 farm bill debate, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has released a report on how Mississippi River Basin (MRB) fertilizer run-off is contributing to a massive oxygen-depleted hypoxia zone in the Gulf of Mexico.

Key Issues: 
Sunday, September 20, 2009

Finding ways to reduce fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions while producing enough energy to support economic development worldwide is this century’s preeminent challenge. We must meet this challenge while simultaneously reducing environmental degradation, poverty and hunger. The United States must make a sustained commitment to invest in and develop renewable energy sources that contribute to meeting these challenges.

Key Issues: 
Friday, September 18, 2009


Published November 16, 2007

Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Associated Press (+ over 200 outlets), Sam Hananel and Mary Clare Jalonick

Published June 11, 2007

From Texas billionaires to Washington lobbyists, it's no secret that wealthy people can get federal farm subsidies.

Key Issues: 
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

United Press International, Staff Published January 15, 2006

BIG SKY, Mont. -- Environmentalists, fishermen and city officials are challenging the farmers and ranchers who have long controlled water resources in the West.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Argus Leader, Faith Bremner

Published September 10, 2008

Senate Democrats are about to renege on an earlier plan to give more money to programs that pay farmers and ranchers to protect wildlife habitat and water quality, a spokesman for the Environmental Working Group said Tuesday.

Key Issues: 
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Traditional Favoritism to Agricultural Interests Is Challenged as Demand Increases

Washington Post, Juliet Eilperin

BIG SKY, Mont. -- A hundred years after the city of Los Angeles and San Fernando Valley farmers battled neighboring Owens Valley for control over water from the Owens River, there's a new kind of water war in the West. From Montana to Arizona to California and beyond, alliances of environmentalists, fishermen and city dwellers are challenging the West's traditional water barons -- farmers and ranchers -- who have long controlled the increasingly scarce resource.

Key Issues: 
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Des Moines Register, Philip Brasher

Published September 10, 2008

The new farm bill has barely taken effect and the Democrat-controlled Senate is already moving to shrink spending levels for some land-conservation programs, environmental groups say.

Key Issues: 
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

How well a rewrite of an important federal law related to environmental uses of water is working was expected to be aired Friday, March 24, at a Central Valley workshop. The Water and Power Subcommittee was to examine the impacts of the 1992 Central Valley Project Improvement Act, which reallocated water from agricultural uses and reserved it for environmental purposes as well as setting up a fund to restore fish and wildlife.

Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Mitchell Daily Republic, Seth Tupper

Published September 10, 2008

An environmental watchdog group and a South Dakota outdoorsman slammed Congress Tuesday for proposing legislation that would purportedly slash millions from conservation programs in the recently adopted farm bill.

Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Capital Press Agricultural Weekly, Chip Power

A handful of the Central Valley’s influential agricultural interests pleaded with a congressional panel to roll back portions of a 14-year-old federal law that elevated environmental uses of water to the same priority as crops. The law in question, known as the Central Valley Project Improvement Act, was amended in 1992 to give environmental uses of water more emphasis.

Friday, September 18, 2009

Mitchell Daily Republic, Seth Tupper

Published September 12, 2008

Hundreds of South Dakotans already are being turned away from a conservation program that could see a pledged funding increase rescinded by Congress and the president.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

A slideshow on several key environmental issues.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Hoosier Ag Today, Gary Truitt

Published September 12, 2008

Environmental groups are not happy to see the Senate is already trying to cut spending levels for some of the conservation programs included in the 2008 Farm Bill. The Environmental Quality Incentives Program - or EQIP - would reportedly get just over one-billion dollars in 2009 under a Senate appropriations measure.

Key Issues: 
Friday, September 18, 2009

Devastating floods and bad weather in the Midwest are raising the tide of opposition against the renewable fuels standard. Groups that have been pressing lawmakers to reconsider federal supports for ethanol are now pointing to flooded fields in the nation’s cornbelt as further evidence the United States may struggle to meet the standard.

Key Issues: 
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Des Moines Register, Craig Cox

Published November 3, 2008

Two recent reports in the Register make it clear that we need to overhaul our biofuels policy.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

Corn grower Tim Recker says Barack Obama’s relatively strong showing in rural Iowa should provide a warning to both parties: Attack ethanol subsidies at your peril.

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Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Bakersfield Californian, Bill Walker

Published October 29, 2005

In his recent Community Voices column, the president of Westlands Water District blasted Environmental Working Group's investigation of the district's proposed federal water subsidies contract.

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