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AgMag BLOG

Feeding your mind, saving the planet >>

The Latest from AgMag

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Labeling food that contains genetically engineered, or “GMO,” ingredients will not cost the preposterous $81.9 billion that the corn industry claims. The new study – paid for by the Corn Refiners Association – greatly exaggerates the cost of labeling products that contain GMOs.

 

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Monday, February 22, 2016

William James, the father of modern psychology, once said, “There's nothing so absurd, that if you repeat it often enough, people will believe it.” This must be the strategy of genetically engineered, or “GMO,” labeling opponents who continue to falsely claim that labeling will cost the average family $500 a year.

 

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Monday, February 22, 2016

This week, the Senate Committee on Agriculture will consider a new version of the DARK Act. The House of Representatives has already passed legislation blocking your right to know what’s in your food. Here are the top 10 reasons to oppose the Senate version of the DARK Act.

 

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Monday, February 22, 2016

Busy consumers want ingredients disclosed on food labels – not embedded in electronic codes that must be scanned with a smart phone.
 

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Friday, February 19, 2016

Some members of the Senate are trying to lure their colleagues to the dark side by cosponsoring a version of what critics call the DARK – Deny Americans the Right to Know – Act.

 

Friday, February 19, 2016

The Grocery Manufacturers Association covered up $11 million in corporate payments for an aggressive ad campaign that helped defeat a Washington State GMO labeling ballot initiative, according to previously secret documents disclosed this week by Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson.

 

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Thursday, February 18, 2016

The Environmental Protection Agency is falling short in its duty to protect Americans from the dangers of glyphosate, the most widely used weed killer in agriculture, according to a scientific review published online yesterday (Feb. 17) in the journal Environmental Health. The agency’s estimates of safe levels of exposure are based on outdated science, and its scientists are not sufficiently monitoring how much glyphosate is getting into food and people.
 

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Thursday, February 18, 2016

The Food and Drug Administration plans to start testing food for traces of glyphosate, the world’s most commonly used pesticide. I know what you’re thinking: the federal government wasn’t doing that already?!

 

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Friday, February 12, 2016

We’re fooling ourselves if we think that voluntary conservation efforts are going to solve the Corn Belt’s dirty water problems.

 

Thursday, February 11, 2016

Today, the House Agriculture Committee will hold a hearing on how the “regulatory agenda” of the Environmental Protection Agency is destroying rural America.

 

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Thursday, February 11, 2016

This week, President Obama released a 2017 fiscal year budget proposal that would save taxpayers more than $18 billion and better protect America’s land and water.

 

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Like most Americans, I have firsthand experience on how insurance is supposed to work. I’ve had auto insurance since the end of high school when I got the keys to my first car. And I’ve paid for health insurance since my first real job out of college. 

Thursday, February 4, 2016

The House Committee on Agriculture, in a recent letter to the budget committee, boasts of being “proud to have made a significant contribution to deficit reduction with the passage of the (2014) farm bill.”

 

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Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Americans are more likely than Europeans to be exposed to Monsanto’s glyphosate weed killer. That’s in large part because the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s calculations to determine allowable levels of glyphosate use are much more lax than the European Union’s.

 

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Tuesday, February 2, 2016

More than 3.5 billion pounds of glyphosate herbicide have been sprayed in the U.S. since it first hit the market as Monsanto’s “Roundup” in 1974, according to a paper published today by agricultural economist Charles Benbrook in the open-access journal Environmental Sciences Europe.

 

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Friday, January 29, 2016

The price tag for subsidizing cottonseed turns out to be a whopping $10 billion over the next 10 years. The cotton industry wants to take that big chunk of change out of the pockets of taxpayers who are already hard-pressed.

 

 

 

Friday, January 29, 2016

In 2014, Congress eliminated direct payments to farmers, replacing them with two new subsidy programs known as Agricultural Risk Coverage (ARC County) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC). The Congressional Budget Office declared that that this switch would save taxpayers billions of dollars over the life of the Farm Bill. It didn't.

 

Thursday, January 28, 2016

The corn ethanol mandate requires refiners to blend more and more ethanol into gasoline. But there is already a “natural” marketplace demand for ethanol. If there were no mandate, gasoline refiners would still blend corn ethanol to boost octane and as an oxygenate to lower tailpipe pollutants.

 

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Volkswagen could be fined up to $90 billion for violating the federal Clean Air Act by jerry-rigging diesel engines to burn cleaner on emissions tests. The added air pollution will cause up to 60 premature deaths of Americans a year. But there's a deadlier source of dirty air than VW diesels – one that's actually touted as reducing air pollution: corn ethanol.

 

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Friday, January 22, 2016

Huge multinational corporations are selling off their crop insurance businesses. The reason, according to the industry, is that business is just too bad, despite billions in federal subsidies. What they don’t point out is other multinationals are snapping up those same companies.

 
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